Currently viewing the tag: "Sustainable ICT"

[This article was originally published on ICTFOOTPRINT.eu website]

Last week ICTFOOTPRINT.eu attended SMARTGREENS 2017, in Porto, Portugal, a conference that brought together researchers, designers, developers and practitioners interested in the advances and applications in Smart Cities, Green Information and Communication Technologies, Sustainability, Energy Aware Systems and Technologies.

This provided an excellent forum to showcase the project with an exhibition booth, where SMARTGREENS attendees got more detailed information about ICTFOOTPRINT.eu services, represented by Trust-IT Services (project coordinator) and EUROCITIES (project partner).

Smart cities as a key factor in ICT sustainability

Nantes-green-presentationA  20 minute presentation on “green insights” was also given explaining how ICTFOOTPRINT.eu services help cities reducing their ICT carbon footprint, by making informed decisions on how to make their ICT services sustainable and energy efficient.

The audience was made aware of why “green IT” is important for cities and why they have a key role in making the ICT sector more sustainable. ICT can save up to €600 billion & decrease 15% of carbon emissions in 2020, by becoming energy efficient (The Climate Group). Cities contribute to 70% of the world’s greenhouse gases (GHG), where +50% World Population lives.

Thanks to a policy of ‘low-carbon’ eco-labeled  IT equipment, Malmo city saved over 500.000 € in one year, while Linkoping decreased energy consumption by 30% (80.000 €).

In addition, some cities favouring green IT ecosystems, such as Nantes (France), where the city has organised demos of green IT projects, developed a Green Code Lab and a global eco-design certificate for an energy-efficient website, among other examples.

Getting familiar with tools & services for sustainability in ICT sector

Attendees were also made aware of ICTFOOTPRINT.eu tools which have been carefully developed to face the most common reasons why organisations do not become sustainable in ICT: lack of knowledge and expertise, lack of time, and low awareness of the benefits.

The Webinars give training and information to those who do not  have expertise and want to make their organisation more sustainable. The free marketplace is the online meeting point to find sustainable ICT suppliers with services and products that help stakeholders achieve lower levels of ICT carbon footprint.

The Self-Assessment Tool for ICT Services, known as SAT-S is a useful, free, quick and easy-to-use tool to calculate the carbon footprint of ICT services, which helps users make informed decisions on how to make their ICT services sustainable and energy efficient. The multilingual online help-desk (English, French, Spanish, Italian & German) gives customised support on sustainable ICT standards.

New audiences to promote energy efficiency in ICT

ICTFOOTPRINT.eu is happy to have showcased the project to new audiences and to find new synergies with different stakeholders, from researchers to Standard Development Organisations, which will support Europe in becoming more sustainable in its ICT.

Download the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu presentation here

Get the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu Flyer customised for Cities & Public Administrators here

Access the photo gallery on Flickr

env_energy_saving_ECaudiovisual Digital technologies are key enablers in reducing the carbon footprint of cities and improving energy efficiency. ICTs have a significant role to play vis-à-vis greening our urban spaces as they can provide energy savings to the building stock, improve the functioning of the electrical grid and water management systems etc.

Nonetheless, the ICT sector has a responsibility to reduce and minimise its carbon emissions. In pursuance of such ambitions, ‘smart cities’ are expected to incorporate the environmental impact of digital technologies which are deployed into their strategic thinking and planning*.

The Green Digital Charter and ICTFOOTPRINT.EU projects are seeking cities which are implementing projects, policies and activities aimed at measuring and/or reducing energy consumption of digital technologies.

The Swedish cities of Malmö and Linköping are prime examples of cities prioritising carbon-neutral technologies when approaching the marketplace.

All best practices shall be showcased during the SmartGreens conference in Porto (22 April) and the EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) in June.

Share yours with us at Rebecca.Portail[at]eurocities.eu


(*) see: ICTFOOTPRINT.EU 5th webinar on Solutions for energy management & Life Cycle Assessment)

 

In an interview published in the EU Smart Cities Information System’s April 2016 newsletter, Nikolaos Kontinakis gives an insight into his motives and experiences as project coordinator for the knowledge society and smart cities projects of EUROCITIES, Brussels, and talks about his perception of ‘sustainable smart cities’.

Nikolaos Kontinakis coordinates the Green Digital Charter initiative and EUROCITIES work for the development of a performance measurement framework for smart cities under the CITYkeys project and the promotion of green ICT via the ICTfootprint.eu project. He also represents EUROCITIES in the SSCC-CG of CEN/CENELEC. For the last 15 years, he has worked as a project coordinator and researcher in the areas of ICT, energy policy and the smart and sustainable development of local authorities.

Read the full interview on the EU Smart Cities Information System’s website: www.smartcities-infosystem.eu

Smart Sustainable Cities – Reconnaissance Study (UNU-EGOV and IDRC)

As the global urban population is expected to grow exponentially by 2050, cities will face unprecedented sustainability challenges. A new report published by the United Nations University and funded by Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC), reviews smart city research and additional smart city case-studies. In particular, we welcome the inclusion of Barcelona, a signatory of the Green Digital Charter, with the ‘Sustainable Barcelona Map’ project.

The authors of the report highlight the importance of local circumstances in building smart cities as well as the need to involve a great variety of stakeholders. The report draws a series of policy recommendations, from open government initiatives to local sector-specific initiatives and citizen participation. Another one is about sharing best practices, a mission at the heart of the GuiDanCe project.

As such, cities’ “vision should not focus merely on technological development, but also highlight improvements in the economic, social, cultural, ecological, and governance dimensions. Leveraging social and cultural changes introduced by the Smart Sustainable City transformation is an opportunity to instil civic values in the society.”

 

 

Read the original article from the United Nations University, ‘Smart Sustainable Cities – Reconnaissance Study’ by clicking here.

Full report is available at http://bit.ly/25yCqwa (PDF English version).


On 3-4 May 2012, the European Commission organised a two day conference on sustainable ICT, smart grids and smart cities, which was opened by Neelie Kroes, Commission vice-president and Günther Oettinger, commissioner for energy.

The conference brought together policy makers from local and European level and stakeholders such as telecoms companies, energy providers, regulators and consumer organisations.

Participants exchanged ideas on how ICT can help make cities greener. During the panel on ‘integrated urban solution in smart cities and communities’, Barcelona and Eindhoven presented ICT-enabled solutions designed to support them in achieving their Covenant of Mayors commitments. We co-organised and chaired the session on ‘reducing the ICT footprint in cities’, which focused on the other aspect of ICT for sustainability: greening ICT itself. Malmo presented its sustainable ICT plan developed in line with its Green Digital Charter commitments.

Did you miss the conference?  You can now watch the videos and photos of the main sessions online.

See also: Access the Conference materials online