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Smart Sustainable Cities – Reconnaissance Study (UNU-EGOV and IDRC)

As the global urban population is expected to grow exponentially by 2050, cities will face unprecedented sustainability challenges. A new report published by the United Nations University and funded by Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC), reviews smart city research and additional smart city case-studies. In particular, we welcome the inclusion of Barcelona, a signatory of the Green Digital Charter, with the ‘Sustainable Barcelona Map’ project.

The authors of the report highlight the importance of local circumstances in building smart cities as well as the need to involve a great variety of stakeholders. The report draws a series of policy recommendations, from open government initiatives to local sector-specific initiatives and citizen participation. Another one is about sharing best practices, a mission at the heart of the GuiDanCe project.

As such, cities’ “vision should not focus merely on technological development, but also highlight improvements in the economic, social, cultural, ecological, and governance dimensions. Leveraging social and cultural changes introduced by the Smart Sustainable City transformation is an opportunity to instil civic values in the society.”

 

 

Read the original article from the United Nations University, ‘Smart Sustainable Cities – Reconnaissance Study’ by clicking here.

Full report is available at http://bit.ly/25yCqwa (PDF English version).

 

“The goal of a Smart City is to invest in technology in order to create economic, social and environmental improvements. That is an economic and political challenge, not a technology trend; and it is an imperative challenge because of the nature and extent of the risks we face as a society today.”

 

The futuristic “Emerald City” in the 1939 film “The Wizard of Oz“. The “wizard” who controls the city is a fraud who uses theatrical technology to disguise his lack of real power

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“There should be an urgent political debate concerning how city leaders and local authorities enact policies and other measures to steer investments in the most powerful tool we have ever created, digital technology, to address those threats”.

 

 

Rick Robinson,  current chairman of the Birmingham Smart City Alliance, has been recently asked to provide some evidence on Smart Cities and Infrastructures to the United Nations Commission on Science and Technology for Development.

 

 

You can follow his interesting work on his blog, The Urban Technologist, regularly updated.