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Green Digital Charter collection of case studies 2017

24 case-studies for 21 contributing cities: GDC signatories are leading the way in deploying digital solutions to reduce their carbon footprint and improve their citizens’ quality of life. Buildings, energy, transport, e-participation, green ICT, waste management :  this third publication gathers inspiring (and replicable?) solutions. Each case-study has its own person of contact. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with them!

Read our Flipbook at http://bit.ly/2ngXXu4

Or even browse the online book below!

 

This edition is already the third! Access the 2015 and 2016 catalogues on this page : http://bit.ly/GDC-case-studies.

 

 

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ESPRESSO” focuses on the development of a conceptual Smart Cities Information Framework, with the scope of making standards and technologies for smart cities interoperable. In short, among others, it helps cities better plan investment in Smart City projects – by way of setting up a KPI Framework and standardization roadmap.

How to benefit from “ESPRESSO” outputs?
  • Become part of their Smart City Stakeholder Network. The consortium regularly organizes webinars on themes important for smart cities and their implementation and monitoring processes, including standardization. Registration can here.
  • Read the Smart City Strategic Growth Map”, a publication that provides a self-assessment tool for cities and addresses more in-depth the issue of smart cities, asset management, standards, progress measurement at the level of urban investment.

More information on the project’s website at http://espresso.espresso-project.eu/

Smart-to-Future

This event is sponsored by EUROCITIES. https://tmt.knect365.com/smart-future-cities/sponsors

Next 25-26 April 2018, London is hosting ‘Europe’s only city-centric event for citizen-centric smart cities’: the seventh edition of the ‘Smart to Future Cities’ summit. Practical and scalable applications improve citizens’ quality of life and local government’s efficiency. For cities with a smart vision, the need for alternative procurement, effective partnership models and innovative but economical technology solutions is more important than ever.

Cities’ delegates from all across Europe and the world will gather during this two-days conference. Civil servants within a local or central government organisation are able to attend the event for free. Please email Georgie Beer (georgie.beer@knect365.com) to register.

Post-Brexit: how cities keep cooperating

On 26 April (11:50), Nikolaos Kontinakis, senior project coordinator on smart cities, will inject EUROCITIES’ vision in a panel discussion dedicated to ‘the fate of the UK’s smart cities and their European collaborators in post-Brexit landscape’.

Right in the aftermath of the UK referendum’s results in favour of the Brexit in June 2016, Johana Rolland, mayor of Nantes and EUROCITIES’ rotating president at the time declared that “the EU can be revived if we look to our cities. We, EUROCITIES, will continue cooperating with large British cities.” [Read the reactions from EUROCITIES’ members on Express]

Cities beyond borders of the European Union territory are already part of EUROCITIES network: Reykjavik and Bergen are ‘full members’ of the network and many cities across Turkey, Ukraine and even Moscow are benefiting from their status of ‘associate member’ to attend physical events or access online resources, knowledge being open across national borders.

Full conference agenda available here.

Visit the event’s website : https://tmt.knect365.com/smart-future-cities/

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REPLICATE-workshopSome years after the start of several H2020 Smart Cities and Communities, the smart city solutions and measures implemented in those cities reveal their first results and have already given to cities valuable information on how to best achieve their transformation.

The 12 projects implement wide range of solutions from building retrofitting to e-mobility and citizen engagement. About 76 cities out of which 36 cities are lighthouse cities, meaning that they have demonstration areas and they implement the solutions. In each project there are follower cities, ensuring that those cities will be the first who replicate.

The 40 follower cities will be brought together in Brussels for a full day on 26th January, at INEA’s premises and focus on the needs of these cities. Follower cities by participating in the Replication workshop will be able to discuss openly the challenges and issues of replicating specific smart city measures with several lighthouse cities, cross-projects, city networks, the European Commission and INEA.

How to pave the way for successful replication?

The purpose is to exchange about how concrete measures can be implemented and take the necessary steps for and within the follower cities to pave the way for successful replication. The day will be organised around 2 rounds of active discussions in 3 thematic workshops; one on urban mobility, one on low energy districts and one on integrated infrastructure. Each of the workshop will be divided in several roundtables to ensure a contribution from all participants and more direct exchanges.

The day will end with an open discussion on how to get round the barriers and restrains to implement smart solutions in cities.

 

Follower cities can register for this event, before 15 January, here: https://goo.gl/ZY6gmw

Contact: Bernadett Köteles-Degrendele, Sharing Cities, EUROCITIES (Bernadett.degrendele@eurocities.eu)

Agenda: http://nws.eurocities.eu/MediaShell/media/DesignAgenda.pdf

Where : INEA premises, Chaussée de Wavre 910, B-1049, Brussels (BELGIUM)

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Sustainable, smart, resilient, green, free-flowing, econological, healthy. What will our future city look like?

Digital transition, climate action, everything-as-a-service, sustainable mobility, circular economy. How will our cities operate in the next decades?

Big Data, Internet of Things, blockchain, electromobility. Which technologies will be the game-changers in the foreeseable future?

New governance models, co-creation, citizen participation, public procurement for innovative solutions, innovation management. What are the challenges cities need to tackle?

  Register now at http://bit.ly/2k4yzZG

On Tuesday 23 January 2018 will be held EUROCITIES’ annual event on smart cities. Untitled “Imagine the Urban Future: Innovation, Collaboration, Trust”, this full-day conference will focus on trends, technologies and challenges that will shape future European cities. City representatives, high level policy makers and experts from across Europe will debate over expectations, opportunities and the impact of digital technologies in co-creating future cities and societies, with citizens.

The morning panel discussion will be followed by two rounds of parallel technical workshops, in which member cities are called to bring in their specific needs, challenges, concerns and concrete examples. The day will end with the GDC 2017 award ceremony to mark the closing of the GuiDanCe project in February.

MEET OUR FINALISTS

This full-day event is open to the public.

Agenda: GDCAgenda_flyerformat_20180108_final

 

data-protection-lockersThe conference will be preceeded by a technical training for cities’ data officers on the implementation of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). See: http://bit.ly/2Al7bha

Limited number of seats available (25 pers. max). Register now

LeMonde-Prix-de-l'innovation-urbaine

In French, smart cities are “villes intelligentes”; and for the third year in a row, Le Monde is willing to reward the best urban innovations happening in France, Europe and beyond.

How will the cities of the future look like? How innovation can benefit cities’ inhabitants, while respecting citizens’ privacy and including the whole population? What new services will allow to progress in the energetic transition and the circular economy?

 

The jury, composed of academics, urbanists and architects but also experts from the private sector, public companies and NGOs, will examine 5 categories of project

  • Civic participation
  • Housing
  • Energy
  • Mobility
  • Cultural action
  • Urban innovation (social innovation or circular economy)

Winning projects in each category will receive: 1 000€ and an article on Le Monde. In addition, one project will be awarded with the Jury Price (2 000€).

Deadlines for applications :

25 February 2018 : European projects

13 May 2018 : projects outside Europe

Applications must be submitted on Le Monde Agorize online platform: https://www.agorize.com/fr/challenges/smart-cities-2018
Read the rules here.

Follow the competition on Twitter @lemonde_cities

Genoa-SmartWeek

From 20 to 24 November 2017, the city of Genoa is hosting “The power of innovation”, the third edition of Genova Smart Week“, a week of  conferences, technical and educational workshops, expo and networking events that will be attended by national and international players to share their views about innovations for the development of a livable city.

READ THE PROGRAMME

The week-long event is sponsored by the City of Genoa and the Association Genoa Smart City, in collaboration with local and European partners.

Twitter feed : #GSWeek2017 – @GenoaSmartWeek


The city of Genoa signed the Green Digital Charter. Visit their profile at http://www.greendigitalcharter.eu/signatory-cities/genoa

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EUROCITIES’ Green Digital Charter/GuiDanCe project is setting up an online training, for cities only, on ‘Energy Efficiency in Data Centres: Lessons Learned from Evaluating Over 200 Public Sector Data Centres in Europe’.

Tuesday 5 December

11:00-12:00 C.E.T (Brussels time)

WATCH THE RECORDING HERE

The session will provide an overview of the lessons learned from the EU H2020-funded EURECA project (https://www.dceureca.eu/). Energy-saving opportunities, barriers to adoption and running cost of facilities are among the areas covered by the training. Some of the material presented will highlight for the first time some interesting results around average running cost of servers in the public sector, IT energy consumption distribution, and key factors affecting energy efficiency beyond PUE. Experience from a city involved in a project will be shared with the audience.

The training is suitable for civil servants including heads of IT’s, CxO’s, data centre managers, Energy managers/officers, sustainability managers/officers, as well as procurers.

Continuous Professional Development: Attendees of the training session will receive an official EURECA / GDC training certificate.

Agenda

11:00 – 11:05 : Introductory remarks, by Rebecca Portail (Green Digital Charter, EUROCITIES)

11:05 – 11:25 : ‘Making the Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Data Centres: Lessons Learned from Evaluating Over 200 Public Sector Data Centres in Europe’, by Dr. Rabih Bashroush, coordinator of the EURECA project.

11:25 – 11:45: ‘Northern Ireland exploit datacentre and cloud services to deliver better citizen services’, by Caron Alexander, Director of Digital Shared Services at Department of Finance (Northern Ireland)

11:45- 11:55 : Q&A

11:55 – 12:00 : Closing remarks

 

Our speakers:

Rabih-Bashroush-pictureDr. Rabih Bashroush is the Coordinator of the H2020 EURECA project and the Director of the Enterprise Computing research group (http://bit.ly/2ruEu8b) at the University of East London. Before joining UEL, he spent 10 years at the Queen’s University Belfast in various roles. He held visiting scientist positions at Carnegie Mellon University (USA), Philips Research Labs (Netherlands), and Danfoss Power Electronics (Denmark). In 2016, he was appointed as the coordinator of the EU Commission DG CONNECT Smart Cities Research Cluster (https://www.smartcitiescluster.eu/) on Energy Efficiency in Data Centers.

He serves on the CEN/CENELEC/ETSI Coordination Group on Green Data Centers; the BSI TCT/7/3 Telecommunications; Installation requirements: Facilities and infrastructures – CEN/CENELEC TC215; and the BSI ST/46 ISO SC 39 Sustainability For and By IT standardisation committees. He served on the EU Commission Expert Working Group for Best Environmental Practice in the Telecommunication and ICT services sector and the EU Consultation Forum for the EcoDesign legislation for energy efficient Servers. Dr Bashroush has worked with a number of central and local governments in Europe on energy efficiency projects of varying sizes.

Contact: R.Bashroush@qub.ac.uk

Mrs. Caron Alexander is Director of Digital Shared Services at Department of Finance of the Government of Northern Ireland Government. She will share her experience in collaborating with the EURECA project from the public sector’s side.

Connect with her on LinkedIn.

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In a discussion published on the new version of the EIP-SCC website, Graham Colclough (UrbanDNA) makes an attempt to answer a critical question for the ‘smart city’ market and yet, one that is quite impossible to get an easy answer to: How much does an urban data platform cost?

For the full article, click here.

What matters for us in this article are the definitions of ‘smart city’ concepts as used and understood within the European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities (EIP-SCC), and in particular in its Action Cluster working on ‘Urban Platforms’.

 

Those definitions are being relayed in italics below and this article goes beyond them, to investigate the deeper costs (or societal challenges) that can be brought about by urban data platforms.

An ‘Urban Platform’ is …

… the implemented realisation of a loigcal architecture/design that brings together (we say “integrates”) data flows within and across city systems

… and exploits modern technologies (sensors, cloud services, mobile devices, analytics, social media etc)

… providing the building blocks that enable cities to rapidly shift from fragmented operations to include predictive effective operations, and novel ways of engaging and serving city stakeholders

… in order to transform, in a  way that is tangible and measurable, outcomes at local level (e.g. increase energy efficiency, reduce traffic congestion and emissions, create (digital) innovation ecosystems, efficient city operations for administrations and services).

Why does Europe need harmonised standards for smart cities? Read the full interview with Dita Charanzová, a Czech MEP and vice-chair of the European Parliament’s Internal Market Committee, published on euractiv.com.


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City Data

‘City Data’ is that which is held by any organisation – government, public sector, private sector or not-for-profit – which is providing a service or utility, or is occupying part of the city in a way that can be said to have a bearing on local populations and the functioning of that space.

This initial part of the definition brings the question of data ownership. Who owns the data collected in smart cities? What impact on citizens’ privacy? On this issue, the European Parliament published in September 2015 a study for the LIBE committee untitled ‘Big Data and Smart Devices and Their Impact on Privacy’.

It can be static, near-real time or in the future, real time, descriptive or operational.

Further, in the future, data will be to a greater extent generated by individual citizens and this too (with due consideration to privacy and a strong trust framework) can be considered city data.

 

What can cities do to protect privacy?
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While acknowledging that urban data platforms are engines for more efficient urban governance (in the area of energy and mobility especially), good governance implies the adoption of a clear data management scheme, in line with EU rules.

In Europe, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the new EU legal framework on data privacy and security which attempts to deal with these challenges, adopted in April 2016. A dedicated portal has been created to prepare all actors collecting, processing and storing data in Europe, and that of European citizens. Visit the GDPR portal at http://www.eugdpr.org/

Earlier this year, the Green Digital Charter (GuiDanCe project) organised a webinar on ‘Data management and citizens’ privacy in smart cities’ and open governance. The speakers were Daniel Sarasa (Zaragoza City Council) and Antonio Kung (EIP-SCC ‘Citizen Focus’ Action Cluster on the implementation of the GDPR).

. You can watch the recording at http://bit.ly/2omBDO1.

This article is an extract from the original article published on buildup.eu (http://www.buildup.eu/en/node/54611). 

Beginning in October 2017, IRIS, a new EIP-SCC project, will harness user-demand driven energy and mobility services; encourage more collaborative and effective urban planning and governance; as well as validate business model and technical innovations to fuel smart sustainable city aspirations across the continent.

IRIS: integrated and replicable solutions for co-creation in sustainable cities

These initiatives will be lead by lighthouse cities of Utrecht (NL, Project Coordinator), Gothenburg (SE) and Nice Côte d’Azur (FR) and their follower cities Vaasa (FI), Alexandroupolis (GR), Santa Cruz de Tenerife (ES), and Focsani (RO). Each city will draw upon a mix of universities and research organisations, local authorities, innovation agencies and private expertise to accelerate entire communities to adopt ambitious energy, mobility and ICT initiatives.

All three ‘lighthouse’ cities are signatories of the Green Digital Charter. Together, they will deliver on a key commitment: working together to promote the best applications and results of ICT solutions. Read the full text of the Charter here.

5 key challenges

  • Energy positive districts
  • Smart energy management
  • Smart e-mobility
  • Digital city innovation platform
  • Citizen engagement and co-creation

Across all seven city locations, IRIS will work to apply their own winning mix with an ‘Open innovation’ approach embodied by the use of FIWARE to encourage professional collaboration and unlocking the collective intelligence of communities with co-creation techniques. At a European level, this open approach will ensure IRIS plays a proactive and full role in supporting the work of the nine existing SCC projects currently representing nearly 50 cities, as well as other projects and horizontal initiatives joining the smart cities community and thematic European Innovation Partnership.

 


This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 774199

twitter: @IRISsmartcities

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EUROCITIES, in collaboration with the Sharing Cities project, is pleased to invite you to our annual brokerage event on the Horizon 2020 Smart Cities & Communities call.

This year the event is taking place on Thursday 25 October 2017, in Brussels, one day after the official smart cities info day organised by the European Commission and INEA.

This brokerage event will offer an opportunity for cities representatives to develop consortia and project ideas to respond to the Horizon 2020 Smart Cities 2018 call for proposals and to learn from the results of previous projects. It will also provide useful insights on how to develop a successful replication strategy and create investment possibilities that will continue beyond the end of the project lifetime. During the event, cities representatives are invited to present a project idea or their city activities in the area of smart cities, which could contribute to proactive matchmaking between potential actors.

 

Registration

Participation is free of charge and is reserved to city representatives only or organisations coming on their behalf. Participants need to register before 13 October here : http://bit.ly/2gKj97A.

More information (and detailed agenda) on EUROCITIES website or www.sharingcities.eu

 

CEN-CENELEC-ETSI-conf-Oct2017

19 October 2017 (08:30 – 16:00 CET)

Albert Borschette Congress Centre

Rue Froissart 36, 1040 Brussels

REGISTER HERE

How to replicate smart city solutions? Are standards the right tools for cities? Can the European Standardization Organizations be part of the cities’ journey towards a smart and sustainable future?

Cities are not always fully aware of what standards can offer, as they may not be familiar with the value voluntary standards bring and how to get involved in the standardization system. Hosted by the European Commission’s DG GROW, this conference will bring cities and standardizers together to debate on priorities and needs for cities in their journey to become smarter and more sustainable.

The results of the debates will feed into the CEN-CENELEC-ETSI Sector Forum on ‘Smart and Sustainable Cities and Communities acting as advisory and coordinating body for European standardization activities in this field. 

Registration is free of charge but please confirm your participation by registering online before 16 October 2017. The conference venue is the European Commission Congress Centre Albert Borschette. To gain access you will be requested during the registration process to provide details such as date of birth, Nationality, Identity card or passport number, ID valid date…

MORE INFO

Visit the event page at www.cvent.com/events/cities-set-standards-to-be-smarter-and-more-sustainable/
To learn more on how standards can help cities, visit the websites of CEN, CENELEC and ETSI.

CONTACT
For any further information, please contact Christine Van Vlierden.


 

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Visit: www.citykeys-project.eu

ETSI – the European Telecommunications Standards Institute [1] – announced the publication of TS 103 463 that defines indicators for smart cities in Europe.

The Technical Specification, under the title “Key Performance Indicators for Sustainable Digital Multiservice Cities”, uses indicators to express smart development at city level in terms of People, Planet, Prosperity, Governance and Propagation.

The set of indicators is based on the work delivered by the EU-funded project CITYkeys in the last two and a half years and especially the sets of KPIs that the project developed. 

Benefits for multiple stakeholders are expected from the new Technical Specification:

  • Cities will support their strategic planning and allow measuring their progress towards smart city goals. In addition, benefits are created from the enhanced collaboration within and between cities, providing the possibility to compare solutions and to find best practices;
  • Policy makers will benefit from the indicators that help to set policy targets and monitor their achievement. ICT users KPI framework’s sub-themes are formulated as policy goals and therefore the indicators are especially useful to follow progress towards policy goals;
  • Solution providers will benefit from better insight into business opportunities for their products and services, and into the possibilities for replication in a different city or context;
  • Industrial stakeholders will benefit from the recommendations for new business, e.g. based on open data;
  • Citizens will benefit from the indicators as they may help to get a better understanding of complex projects and their impacts.

 

The first version of TS 103 463 is publicly available and be downloaded from the ETSI online database [4].

 

eipscc-v2The annual General Assembly of the EIP-SCC will be held in Brussels on Thursday 12 October 2017, with a clear focus on stimulating joint investments in the smart city market, building towards a coordinated plan to make that real in the market at scale.

Cities, industrial players, investors and financiers of smart cities and communities projects will be joined by Commissioners from the sectors concerned, who will be actively involved in the debate to share their thoughts and to help making the Marketplace the arena where smart solutions are developed and implemented in European cities.

“Towards a Joint Investment Programme for Smart Cities” summarises the goal for the General Assembly: to stimulate scale deployment of digital solutions in all sectors involved in the Marketplace.

View the Agenda >>

Registration

Number of seats are limited. As such, registrations will go through a validation process. After registering here, your participation will be confirmed in two steps:

  • Your participation to the General Assembly will be advised in the week following registration submission,
  • if you have shown an interest to attend one of the Marketplace’s breakfast (limited to 100 participants), your participation will be advised by mid-September

Some questions? Please contact EIP-SCC@mci-group.com


The European Commission continues its commitment to the European Innovation Partnership for Smart Cities and Communities (EIP-SCC Market Place), through the sponsorship of DG Energy, DG Move and DG Connect.

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Together with partners, the Ruhr metropolitan region is organising a day of conference on ‘How digitalization change cities – Innovations for the urban economy of tomorrow’. The conference, to take place on Wednesday 6 September in the city of Witten, will highlight the possibilities available for the region’s urban infrastructure and innovative business models compared with international benchmarks.

You can look forward to talks given by, among others, Dr Christian Ketels (Harvard Business School), Nikolaos Kontinakis (EUROCITIES) and Pr. Jan van der Borg (EURICUR, University of Leuven). Experts from the Netherlands, Belgium, Great Britain and Germany will be giving their input during four workshop on the topics of:

  • New mobility
  • Digitalisation of healthcare
  • Urban production
  • Green technologies)

Full agenda of the day : Ruhr Metropolitan Region’s conference program ‘How digitalization changes cities’ – September 6th 2017.

Registration (39€) at this link : http://business.metropoleruhr.de/en/digitalization/

 

Contact person:

Inga vom Hagen-Hülsberg  (Project Manager, Project Development), Wirtschaftsförderung metropoleruhr GmbH, vomhagen-huelsberg@business.metropoleruhr.de

eipscc-v2The Action Cluster for Integrated Infrastructures of the EIP-SCC (European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities) is currently collecting responses to their 5 minutes survey on the ‘Humble Lamppost’ initiative.

The initiative, which aims to offer more efficient and affordable lighting services by upgrading 10 million smart lampposts in European cities both in the means of LED lamppost infrastructure and smart services operating it, now gathers opinions, experiences and vision of cities in regards to the smart lighting.

The contributions will help to increase both scale and the pace of adoption of the ‘Humble Lamppost’ goal. You can take part in the survey until Monday 31 July 2017. In case of any questions about the questionnaire, contact integratedinfrastructure@eu-smartcities.eu.

ESPON 2020 Cooperqtion Programme seeks to get a better understanding of the urban dimensions of digital transition in Europe. This Europe-wide survey seeks to collect data on the level of digitalisation of cities based on the opinions and perceptions of local government authorities and organisations providing public services. Main target groups are city officials dealing with the provision of public services and ICT.

Participate in the survey by completing the online questionnaire (available in EN, FR, DE, ES, IT).

Closing date for submissions:

Friday, the 7th of July 2017.

 

The study will allow European, national, regional and urban authorities to better understand the level of digitalisation of public services, to learn from others through benchmarking and to design actions for the future.

The results of the study will be made publicly available in September 2017 and will be used as inputs for discussions during the key meetings of the Estonian Presidency of the Council of the EU during the second half of 2017.


 

Contact : Martin Gauk, martin.gauk@espon.eu, ESPON 2020 Cooperation Programme

https://www.espon.eu/

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This article was originally published on CityLab.com (Richard Florida, 16 May 2017)

Artificial-intelligence-cranium-colorA report by a panel of leading experts on technology, business, and cities takes a deep dive into the changes that will come about as a result of one key new technology—artificial intelligence.

The panel was chaired by Peter Stone of University of Texas at Austin along with researchers from Rethink Robotics, Allen Institute for AI, Microsoft, and academics from Harvard, MIT, Johns Hopkins, Columbia, UC Berkeley, and other universities from around the world. Their study, Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030, outlines the dramatic impact artificial intelligence (AI) is having and will continue to have for our cities and the way we live and work in them over the next couple of decades.

It outlines the implications of several key dimensions of AI, including:

  • Large-scale learning or algorithms that crunch ever-larger datasets
  • Deep learning procedures that recognize images, video, audio, speech, and language
  • Reinforcement learning that shifts from pattern recognition to experience-driven decision-making
  • Robotic devices that can physically interact with environments and people
  • Computer vision that allows computers to see and perform tasks better than people
  • Natural language processing that does more than react to requests—it communicates through speech
  • Collaborative systems, crowdsourcing, and human computation
  • Algorithms and computational tools that can apply economic and social data to realign incentives for people and businesses
  • The “Internet of Things” that networks appliances, vehicles, buildings, and cameras
  • Neuromorphic computing that mimics biological neural networks to improve the efficiency and robustness of computer systems

The report outlines what these technologies mean for cities and raises deep policy (and downright philosophical) questions about their impact across several areas of urban life. Here are a few thoughts reflecting on what this new technological might promise for cities.

 

Transportation—more than driverless cars

Everyone and their mother is talking about autonomous vehicles, or AVs, which are already being tested on the streets of several cities, including Pittsburgh. The potential relief from traffic congestion and the tragedy of human error on the road make this a top priority for the dream of personal transportation. But technical, economic, and ethical questions about our autonomous future abound—from the possible (major) glitch of pedestrian deaths to the potential job losses from automation to the possible fatal erosion of public transportation. We need to be ready for the next time the car transforms the city.

Artificial intelligence could also help systems be more dynamic. Real-time information, machine learning, and algorithms could turn public transportation into a much more vibrant public good, eliminating much of the current frustrations and frictions they generate now. AI could allow us to better allocate resources to make transportation more reliable and more equitable.

Public safety and privacy

Cities have already begun to deploy a wide variety of AI technologies for security purposes. Expect those trends to continue through to 2030. Analytics have successfully helped combat white collar crime, such as credit-card fraud, and could also prove useful in preventing cyber-crimes in the future. These technologies might not only help police departments solve crimes with less effort but also could assist crime prevention and prosecution by improving record keeping and automatically processing video for anomalies (including evidence of abusive policing).

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But as we’ve seen with this kind of technology deployed for surveillance and predictive policing at the street level, the central question for cities is building trust and eliminating discriminatory targeting. The study argues that with proper research and resources, AI prediction tools could help remove or reduce human bias rather than reinforcing the current systemic problems. But these same powerful tools have a way of replicating the bias of the humans who create the technology in the first place. And techniques like network analysis, which can be used to disrupt criminal or terrorist plots, also have the potential for overreaching, threatening civil liberties, and violating the privacy of city residents.

Work and life

Artificial intelligence also portends major changes to health care, education, home care, and related services. AI may enable more efficient economic development of so called “low-resource communities” that have higher rates of poverty, joblessness, and therefore have limited funds for public programs and infrastructure. With data mining leading incentives and priorities, there’s promise to the idea that AI might unburden systems with limited resources and allocate resources better. Algorithms could connect restaurants to food banks to turn excess in to resources or connect the unemployed to jobs, for example. Harnessing social networks could also help distribute health-related information and address homelessness.

Predictive models could not only help government agencies put limited budgets to better use, they could produce more complex thinking to anticipate future problems rather than reacting to a crisis such as the lead poisoning in Flint. After a crisis hits, AI might assist in allocating resources, say by identifying children at risk of exposure or finding women who are pregnant that might need prenatal care to mitigate adverse birth outcomes.

A key caveat would be to make sure these tools act as a guard against discriminatory behavior—identifying people for services without baking racial indicators or proxy factors into the machine learning of these systems.

The way forward

AI brings a contradictory future to our cities. On the hand, tech-optimists see technology like autonomous vehicles, mobile healthcare, and robot teachers freeing us from mundane chores like commuting and waiting in doctor’s offices and making our cities better, more inclusive and sustainable places. On the other hand, techno-pessimists see a dystopian future where AI and robots take away jobs and we live in a state of perpetual surveillance.

The report takes a more measured approach. “AI will likely replace tasks rather than jobs in the near term, and will also create new kinds of jobs,” the authors state. “But the new jobs that will emerge are harder to imagine in advance than the existing jobs that will likely be lost.”

The study highlights a need for a new set of strategies and policies to guide the use of AI in the city, spanning legality and liability, certifications, agency control, innovation and privacy, labor and taxation. It also calls for more research, training and funding for cities and local governments to better understand and be ready for this coming revolution.

AI presents a complex set of considerations for cities. As with any big new technology, the possibilities are exciting—but mayors, policy makers, and urbanists must be vigilant to ensure that we set in place the regulations and institutions required to make the most of these new technologies while minimizing their downsides.

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This year, digital was right on top of the agenda of this EU Sustainable Energy Week: from large-scale smart city projects to citizen-oriented digital services and apps, ICT assume an essential role in maximising energy consumption in our lives.

The Green Digital Charter welcomed participants at its stand of the Networking Village on Thursday 22 June morning (09:00 – 12:30, Résidence Palace). Signed by 52 European cities, the Charter sets energy efficiency as top priority for signatories.

Digital solutions to save energy

GDC signatories are compiling and implementing local and digital strategies to make the most efficient use of ICTs to improve the economic, social and environment wellbeing of their citizens.

This event was the occasion to discover policies and projects implemented by GDC signatory cities in the area of energy efficiency.

#EUSEW17

Environmentally-sound IT and digital applications  

Already today, carbon directly emitted by the ICT sector (datacentres and telecommunication networks) reaches 2% and is expected to double by 2020. Among the priorities of the Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE) is the establishment of a common methodological framework for the measurement of the energy intensity and carbon emissions arising from the production, transport and selling processes of ICT goods, services and networks.

On Wednesday (14:00 – 15:30), DG CONNECT organised a session on ‘nearly zero-emission’ datacentres, testifying of the Commission’s commitment to foster environmental-sound network infrastructures able to sustain the Digital Single Market (DSM). Laura Baracchi (from Trust-IT) presented the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu project and the self-assessment tool developed to raise awareness on the carbon footprint of digital service (SAT-S).

(Smart) cities are important consumers of digital goods and services, and sometimes even owners of IT infrastructures.Leading by example is one of the GDC signatories’ commitments. Indeed, cities can ensure the measurement, transparency and visibility of each city’s use of ICT infrastructure and digital services in terms of carbon footprint.

Read: Abdeluheb Choho, deputy mayor of Amsterdam and chair of EUROCITIES Environment Forum, “Cities are key players in the clean energy transition”, EurActiv, 19.06.2017

EUSEW Networking Village 7

GDC interactive board also approached the rising issue of energy consumption of ICT devices.

Participants were given the opportunity to self-assess the carbon footprint generated by ICT equipments they own. This small game enabled us to present projects, initiatives and alternative existing in European cities to foster a market for green, energy-efficient and environmental-sound ICT and digital solutions. The game sparked some interesting discussions with stakeholders present in the Networking Village.

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[This article was originally published on ICTFOOTPRINT.eu website]

Last week ICTFOOTPRINT.eu attended SMARTGREENS 2017, in Porto, Portugal, a conference that brought together researchers, designers, developers and practitioners interested in the advances and applications in Smart Cities, Green Information and Communication Technologies, Sustainability, Energy Aware Systems and Technologies.

This provided an excellent forum to showcase the project with an exhibition booth, where SMARTGREENS attendees got more detailed information about ICTFOOTPRINT.eu services, represented by Trust-IT Services (project coordinator) and EUROCITIES (project partner).

Smart cities as a key factor in ICT sustainability

Nantes-green-presentationA  20 minute presentation on “green insights” was also given explaining how ICTFOOTPRINT.eu services help cities reducing their ICT carbon footprint, by making informed decisions on how to make their ICT services sustainable and energy efficient.

The audience was made aware of why “green IT” is important for cities and why they have a key role in making the ICT sector more sustainable. ICT can save up to €600 billion & decrease 15% of carbon emissions in 2020, by becoming energy efficient (The Climate Group). Cities contribute to 70% of the world’s greenhouse gases (GHG), where +50% World Population lives.

Thanks to a policy of ‘low-carbon’ eco-labeled  IT equipment, Malmo city saved over 500.000 € in one year, while Linkoping decreased energy consumption by 30% (80.000 €).

In addition, some cities favouring green IT ecosystems, such as Nantes (France), where the city has organised demos of green IT projects, developed a Green Code Lab and a global eco-design certificate for an energy-efficient website, among other examples.

Getting familiar with tools & services for sustainability in ICT sector

Attendees were also made aware of ICTFOOTPRINT.eu tools which have been carefully developed to face the most common reasons why organisations do not become sustainable in ICT: lack of knowledge and expertise, lack of time, and low awareness of the benefits.

The Webinars give training and information to those who do not  have expertise and want to make their organisation more sustainable. The free marketplace is the online meeting point to find sustainable ICT suppliers with services and products that help stakeholders achieve lower levels of ICT carbon footprint.

The Self-Assessment Tool for ICT Services, known as SAT-S is a useful, free, quick and easy-to-use tool to calculate the carbon footprint of ICT services, which helps users make informed decisions on how to make their ICT services sustainable and energy efficient. The multilingual online help-desk (English, French, Spanish, Italian & German) gives customised support on sustainable ICT standards.

New audiences to promote energy efficiency in ICT

ICTFOOTPRINT.eu is happy to have showcased the project to new audiences and to find new synergies with different stakeholders, from researchers to Standard Development Organisations, which will support Europe in becoming more sustainable in its ICT.

Download the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu presentation here

Get the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu Flyer customised for Cities & Public Administrators here

Access the photo gallery on Flickr

Wednesday 26 April

14:00 – 15:00 CEST (Brussels time)

WATCH THE RECORDING

Thanks to smartphones and apps, Internet of Things (IoT) devices, networks and sensors deployed throughout public spaces, cities are collecting vast amounts of data beneficial for the ‘public good’. This data enables municipalities to develop better-informed decision-making and improve public services (waste management, traffic prediction, energy efficiency).

This webinar intends to show how data management processes by city administrations and use of privacy-by-design standards are key to build trust and resilience in smart cities and open data.

Interested in the topic? The Future of Privacy Forum offers an interactive infographic on smart cities’ technologies and their implications for privacy [click here]

Speakers

Co-author of ‘Zaragoza’s Open Government Strategy 2012-2015’, Daniel collaborates with EUROCITIES on various smart city initiatives and projects.

Zaragoza received the Green Digital Charter (GDC) 2016 Award on ‘Citizen Engagement and Impact on Society’ for the Zaragoza Citizen Card (watch the interview) and contributed to the CITYkeys project

 

  • Antonio Kung (CTO, Trialog) will bring his expertise how privacy management should be integrated in smart cities.

Partner in the EIP-SCC ‘Citizen Focus’ Action Cluster, Antonio is leading the initiative on ‘Citizen-Centric Approach to Data – Privacy by Design’. Antonio chaired a series of workshops aiming at defining measures supporting the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Download/preview the presentation: Data management in smart cities – protecting citizens privacy Trialog Antonio Kung

This webinar is part of GDC/GuiDanCe series of webinars on Citizens in Smart Cities. It is co-organised with the ESPRESSO project, currently developing a conceptual Smart City Information Framework based on open standards.

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env_energy_saving_ECaudiovisual Digital technologies are key enablers in reducing the carbon footprint of cities and improving energy efficiency. ICTs have a significant role to play vis-à-vis greening our urban spaces as they can provide energy savings to the building stock, improve the functioning of the electrical grid and water management systems etc.

Nonetheless, the ICT sector has a responsibility to reduce and minimise its carbon emissions. In pursuance of such ambitions, ‘smart cities’ are expected to incorporate the environmental impact of digital technologies which are deployed into their strategic thinking and planning*.

The Green Digital Charter and ICTFOOTPRINT.EU projects are seeking cities which are implementing projects, policies and activities aimed at measuring and/or reducing energy consumption of digital technologies.

The Swedish cities of Malmö and Linköping are prime examples of cities prioritising carbon-neutral technologies when approaching the marketplace.

All best practices shall be showcased during the SmartGreens conference in Porto (22 April) and the EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) in June.

Share yours with us at Rebecca.Portail[at]eurocities.eu


(*) see: ICTFOOTPRINT.EU 5th webinar on Solutions for energy management & Life Cycle Assessment)

This article was originally published on the Raconteur.net website

Daniël Termont is the mayor of Ghent and EUROCITIES president.

 

Daniël Termont, Mayor of Ghent and EUROCITIES' current president

Daniël Termont, Mayor of Ghent and EUROCITIES’ rotating president

“In Ghent, we combine our historical façades with a forward- looking vision. By 2020, I want my city to be open, inclusive, smart and child friendly. Key to this vision are our citizens – we want to build the Ghent of the future together.

Discussions around smart cities are too often driven by technology and industry. I believe cities, and their citizens, are at the core of the smart city transition. Technology is an important ingredient of course: we are looking to innovative solutions to manage our energy and transport systems better, manage, process and visualise data, and make life easier for all.

But we’re not overlooking the low-tech solutions that complement these: well-organised bike paths, for example, and vertical farming.

Technology for us is a means not an end and becoming smarter is about a whole lot more.

We need to find new ways of working together so we can make the most of everyone’s expertise. Public administrations, citizens, businesses and research institutes: we are all part of the same urban ecosystem and we all have something to offer. By pooling our resources, we can create better solutions that truly address our challenges and are owned by the entire city.

In Ghent, we have several tools to make this happen, such as the Ghent Climate Alliance, which is behind our vision of becoming climate neutral. Our Ghent Living Lab is an innovative platform where citizens, developers, researchers and businesses can co-create their city.

Smart cities rely on data, so opening up data is an important initiative for Ghent. Students and developers can use it to work on new solutions, including apps that make life easier for residents, such as a waste collection calendar and an app, ‘Parkmobile‘, to locate available parking spaces in real time.

We’ve even turned it into a competition: our annual hackathon, Apps for Ghent, invites developers to turn our open data into exciting new apps, such as Studio Dott’s PopBike (video), which enables users to calculate the best bike route and share bikes, and Ghendetta, a game that encourages users to explore city districts.

One of the challenges many cities face with opening data is protecting privacy. Citizens need to be able to access, use and manage their data, and for this they need adequate digital skills. This is a priority for Ghent as we want to make sure technology is accessible to everyone.

It is essential then that we create a level playing field. We need common and open standards and better interoperability between systems. This would open the market to more actors and would also bring down costs, and maximise the release, accessibility and usability of data, helping businesses grow.

Working together on projects is a must for testing and scaling up new solutions. Ghent is involved in several, including the Green Digital Charter, through which we commit to reducing our carbon footprint with smart ICT. We also need direct dialogue with European Union decision-makers.

With the Urban Agenda for the EU and the European Innovation Partnership for Smart Cities and Communities, we see new work processes that support the joining up of different levels of government and different sectors. This is a step in the right direction to address European and urban challenges together.

I am looking forward to the journey ahead and I am pleased to be sharing it with my colleagues at EUROCITIES, the network of major European cities. This is where I can bounce off ideas, discover new solutions and find ways to address shared challenges.

As a mayor, I know every corner of my city and have daily contact with citizens. This knowledge is crucial for making smart city solutions work. Working with cities means working with citizens, so by strengthening the links between EU institutions and cities, we are building a stronger Europe.

 

Heraklion_architecture (2)-smaller-sizeOn 28-29 September, Heraklion will host the second annual Smart Blue City Euro-Mediterranean conference on ’Smart, inclusive and resilient small and medium-sized cities and island communities in the Mediterranean: exploring current research paths and experience-based evidence’.

Combining a scientific conference with an exhibition, the event will bring together city and regional authorities with representatives of industry, SMEs, academics, and professionals to discuss smart solutions to the challenges faced in the region and to explore new market opportunities.

For more information, visit www.smartbluecity.com/ – [leaflet] –

 

EIP

European Innovation Partnership – Smart Cities and Communities

The conference is organised in the frame of the EIP-SCC ‘Smart Cities in the Mediterranean’ strategic partnership (SMART-MED action cluster).

It will focus on areas where ICTs, energy and mobility policies overlap, and will seek to identify transferable solutions.

www.smartcitiesmed.com

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Infographic_webinar_GDC-SharingCities

At 14:00 CET on 14 March, EUROCITIES hosted a public webinar on citizen participation and co-creation in smart cities, where the experiences gathered from the Sharing Cities and Green Digital Charter projects were shared with the participants.

WATCH THE WEBINAR
Reykjavik 
Better-Reykjavik-logo

Reykjavik

[PRESENTATION]

Magnus Y. Josefsson presented the Better Reykjavik collaborative online platform, through which citizens can submit policy proposals to the municipal government.  ‘Better Reykjavik‘ was among the shortlisted projects in the “Citizen participation & impact on society” category of the 2016 edition of the GDC Awards.

Find out more about Reykjavik’s SMART projects and priorities here.

Milan 
Milan

Milan

[PRESENTATION]

During a recent peer-learning visit organised in Milan in the frame of the Sharing Cities project, ‘fellow’ city representatives heard a presentation about the host city’s civic crowdfunding practices.

Find out more about Milan’s SMART projects and priorities here.

About Sharing Cities

Sharing Cities (www.sharingcities.eu) ‘lighthouse’ programme is a proving ground for a better, common approach to making smart cities a reality. By foestering international collaboration between industry and cities, the project seeks to develop affordable, integrated, commercial-scale smart city solutions with a high market potential. The project partners work in close cooperation with the European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities (EIP-SCC) and with other ‘lighthouse’ consortia. Sharing Cities offers a framework for citizen engagement and collaboration at local level, thereby strenghtening trust between cities and citizens. The project draws on €24 million in EU funding. It aims to trigger €500 million in investment and to engage over 100 municipalities across Europe.

 

 

 

Ⓒ URBAN-EU-CHINA

Within the framework of the existing cooperation arrangements between the EU and China, a new H2020 project (URBAN-EU-CHINA) with a consortium of 12 European and Chinese partners will soon be launched. The project will develop an evidence-driven, bottom-up approach to complement the existing top-down strategic approach to cooperation in sustainable urbanisation.

The partners will develop a coordinated series of actions that include a research and innovation agenda; networking events; benchmarking; monitoring; and peer learning activities. The underlying ambition is to address the disconnect between strategic visions and operational realities. The expected results of this 36-month, €1.5 million support action include joint policy strategies, a nursery of joint projects, and city-industry-science partnerships.

EUROCITIES will lead work on matching cities and organising event clusters.

The kick-off of the platform will take place from 19 to 21 March 2017 in the Chinese city of Putian, at the occasion of the 2017 EU-China Forum on Sustainable Urban Development. The partnership will then be officially launched at the occasion of a ceremony hosted in Brussels at the end of March.

horizon2020_0URBAN-EU-CHINA is a Cooordination and Support Action (CSA) funded under the EU Horizon 2020 programme. CORDIS

On 25 January 2017 at the occasion of the conference ‘Cities in Transition‘, the cities of Zaragoza, Lisbon and Rijeka were awarded for their innovative contributions to the objectives of the Green Digital Charter.

WATCH OUR VIDEO

GDC-2016-Awards-1

Citizen participation and impact on society

Carlos Alocen, Daniel Sarasa and Gerardo Lahuerta received the award on behalf of Zaragoza in this category, in recognition of the impact of the ‘Zaragoza Citizen Card’. This multi-purpose smart (RFID) card is part of Zaragoza’s collaborative approach to facilitate citizens’ access to public services. Runner-up cities for this category were Reykjavik (Better Reykjavik and My Neighbourhood) and Utrecht (Traffic Lights Hotline).

Creation of European added value

Lisbon’s integrated management system for energy efficiency developed under the FP7-funded BESOS project was recognised in the ‘European added-value’ category. Implemented in Lisbon and Barcelona, the project is a perfect example of how digital technologies can help in the global fight against climate change. The project’s coordinator, Francisco Goncalves, received the award on behalf of the city of Lisbon. Runner-up cities for this category were Bristol (REPLICATE) and Zagreb (Zagreb Energy Week).

Promoting open and interoperable solutions 

Finally, Tatjana Perse from the city of Rijeka received the award on ‘Promoting open and interoperable solutions’ for the iURBAN smart Decision Support System (DSS) project. This integrated, multilevel and scalable tool has been designed for cities’ administration to critically analyse energy consumption patterns and increase energy efficiency in public buildings. Runner-up cities for this category were Amsterdam (Open Data – Smart Neighbourhoods) and Valencia (Valencia Smart City Platform).

The jury was composed of Miimu Airaksinen (VTT, Finland), Peter Bosch (TNO, Netherlands), Jan Dictus (GOJA Consulting, Austria), and Cristobal Irazoqui (European Commission, DG CNECT).

Cover_front_GDC2016

In total, 21 projects, implemented in 14 cities, were submitted for this second edition of the GDC awards. All nominated projects represent the best in urban innovation – judge by yourself by leafing through our 2016 collection of case studies (bit.ly/GDC–case-studies-2016).

Follow us on Twitter @GDCharter

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Digital innovation is a driver of sustainable urban development all over the world. Approaches to becoming ‘smarter’ may differ, but open and interoperable solutions arguably play a key role in ensuring the sustainability of smart infrastructures.

Public authorities collect and produce reams of data, which can be used to design and deliver innovative services and applications. From a governance perspective, public data also has the potential to contribute to more transparency in municipalities’ urban planning. This is why open data strategies are at the core of smart city initiatives all over Europe.

The third GDC award category will recognise the project that has adopted and implemented open data and/or interfaces; has deployed and/or promoted interoperable solutions; and has tried to promote urban platforms or the better use/re-use of infrastructures, services, tools, etc.

The three finalists are:

  • Amsterdam region’s Open Data – Smart Neighbourhoods (ODSN) project
  • Rijeka’s iURBAN intelligent urban energy tool
  • Valencia’s Smart City Platform

 

Amsterdam region’s ODSN project uses IT to achieve urban climate targets

Commissioned by the Dutch ministry of infrastructure and environment, the Open Data – Smart Neighbourhoods (OSDN) project implements the IREEN roadmap, which was developed by Green IT Amsterdam under the FP7 funding programme between 2011 and 2013. This roadmap for energy-efficient neighbourhoods aims to promote the development of a comprehensive Europe-wide innovation strategy and the take-up of ICT-based energy efficiency solutions in urban districts and neighbourhoods.

Amsterdam_photo city

The ODSN project builds on Amsterdam’s expertise and experience in open data management and in supporting new data-driven projects in five municipalities of the Amsterdam region, namely Haarlem, Tilburg, Zaanstad, Lelystad Airport Business Park, and Heerlen.

The project encourages the participants to learn about the benefits of open data and also about the challenges involved in monitoring, as well as in engaging and protecting the privacy of residents.

More information is available at at Green IT Amsterdam website.

Contact person: Jaak Vlasveld, director of Green IT Amsterdam: jvlasveld[at]greenitamsterdam.nl

 

Rijeka’s iURBAN: intelligent tool for an energy-efficient smart city

Just like all other local and regional authorities, the city of Rijeka must pay the energy bills of public buildings, such as schools, kindergartens, public libraries, and the city council itself.

An open access research book was published online in November 2016, just after the end of the project. Entitled iURBAN: Intelligent Urban Energy Tool, the book introduces this tool that integrates different ICT energy management systems (both hardware and software) in Rijeka) and Plovdiv. This system provides useful data to a novel decision support system needed for the development of associated business models.

iURBAN LogoThe iURBAN smart Decision Support System (smartDSS) addresses a growing market demand for cheaper and cleaner energy services. It enables municipalities to analyse consumption patterns within buildings, detect sources of inefficiency, and identify power-hungry devices that weigh heavily on the municipality’s energy bill. It also helps building managers identify areas where investment is needed.

Interested to know more? Visit the iURBAN website at http://www.iurban-project.eu.

 

Contact person: Tatjana Perse, head of the city of Rijeka’s e-government unit: tatjana.perse@rijeka.hr

 

Valencia Smart City Platform (VLCi)

The Spanish city’s 2020 strategy emphasises innovation, sustainability and environmental quality; promotes entrepreneurship; foresees the emergence of a civic-minded political culture; and aims for the creation of spheres of excellence in promising sectors such as design, renewable energies, health, technology, and arts.

The Valencia Smart City Platform (VLCi) enables the municipality to efficiently manage its public services through the compilation and use of urban, citizenship and service management-related indicators. These enable the city to accurately measure urban behaviour and resources, and offer an integrated view of its operations and management. The indicators also enable Valencia to check itself against other similar cities and to improve its strategic and operational decision making processes over time.

platform_iso_eng

By using some of the 600 indicators integrated in the VLCi platform, the municipality can also provide better services to its citizens. VLCi’s control panel display encourages the use of public open data by citizens, technicians and council officials for urban service management purposes.

To improve interoperability between its municipal services, Valencia has also developed an urban management platform based on FIWARE, an open standard recommended by the European Commission, which smart city developers use to ensure Internet of Things (IoT) compliance.

Further information is available at http://vlci.inndeavalencia.com (in English)

Contact person: Anna Melchor-Pérez, smart city specialist at Las Naves (previously InnDEA Valencia Foundation), Valencia city council: anna.melchor[at]inndeavalencia.com

A ‘smart city’ is a place where digital technologies translate into better public services for citizens, better use of resources and less impact on the environment. With this vision in mind, the EU has been investing in ICT research and innovation (in particular through its Horizon 2020 funding programme) and developing policies as well as partnerships, such as the European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities (EIP-SCC), to speed the deployment of innovative solutions.

Sixteen cross-domain projects are presented in our 2016 collection of case studies. Three of these have been shortlisted by our jury of experts, and one will win the 2016 GDC Award ‘Creation of European added-value’on 25 January.

The three shortlisted projects in this second category are:

  • Bristol’s REPLICATE pilot
  • Lisbon’s BESOS (Building Energy Decision Support Systems for Smart Cities) project
  • Zagreb’s Energy Week

 

Bristol’s REPLICATE project engages citizens in achieving sustainable goals

In 2015, Bristol was the first UK city to receive the European Green Capital Award in recognition of its impressive investment plans for transports and energy, in particular renewables, by 2020.

Bristol is one of threeREPLICATE logo + flag lead cities (’lighthouses’) of REPLICATE (REnaissance of PLaces with Innovative Citizenship And Technology), an EU research and development project aiming to deploy integrated energy, mobility, and ICT solutions in city districts. Bristol has chosen the Ashely, Easton and Lawrence Hill neighbourhood partnership area as its target district.

Bristol’s approach focuses on citizens and addresses a broad range of socio-economic and environmental challenges faced by the city. First, its core innovation is the development of an energy demand management system that can holistically monitor and control energy use in 150 connected homes.

The city is developing a number of other projects and measures that would help increase energy efficiency, promote sustainable mobility, and encourage citizens to change their behaviour.

 

More information at http://replicate-project.eu/bristol/

Contact person: Luke Loveridge, programme manager: luke.loveridge[at]bristol.gov.uk

 

Lisbon’s BESOS project fosters public-private energy efficiency cooperation

Lisbon, capital of Portugal and one of the oldest cities in the world, is very active in European cooperation initiatives and smart city projects. A ‘lighthouse’ member of the Sharing Cities project, Lisbon’s smart city strategy has proved that bringing stakeholders together can provide considerable support for efforts to ensure the sustainability and replicability of solutions developed in pilot projects.

BESOSlogo

Between October 2013 and September 2016, the BESOS (Build Energy Decision Support Systems for Smart Cities) project developed an advanced, integrated energy management system.The project targeted two main groups of stakeholders: infrastructure owners (e.g. municipalities) and operators. This public-private partnership developed a trustworthy open platform, through which partners can share data and services among themselves, as well as with third-party applications.

These valuable data flows enable the design and development of higher-level applications capable of processing data in real timeand feeding analysed data analysis to the city’s energy services.

Lisbon and Barcelona have already tested the BESOS approach.

More information at http://besos-project.eu/

 

Contact person: Francisco Gonçalves, project coordinator, franciscogoncalves[a]lisboaenova.org

 

Zagreb Energy Week: “Development we don’t want to stop but pollution we can”

Zagreb_Energy_Week_2016Over the past seven years, Zagreb Energy Week has become of the city’s flagship events. Held in the month of May under the slogan ‘Development we don’t want to stop but pollution we can’, the organisers call for joint actions that contribute to the implementation of sustainable urban development projects and the preservation of natural resources for future generations.

Financed by the city budget, Zagreb Energy Week is jam-packed with conferences, expert meetings, open-door days, seminars, classes, and workshops dedicated to energy and the environment. These activities allow for rich dialogue and interaction among the experts, and raise citizens’ concern about the environment.

Contact persons: Vlatka Samarinec and Maja Sunjic, expert advisors: vlatka.samarinec[at]zagreb.hr and maja.sunjic[at]zagreb.hr

Since there cannot be a smart city without smart citizens, the award winner in the first category will be a project that has successfully involved citizens and/or other civil society stakeholders; has adopted a bottom-up approach; and is expected to tackle, or has already tackled, local societal challenges.

Of the 14 projects nominated in this category, three stand a good chance of winning the award:

  • Reykjavik’s Better Reykjavik and My Neighbourhood e-participation projects
  • Utrecht’s Traffic lights hotline
  • Zaragoza’s Citizen Card

‘Better Reykjavik’ and ‘My Neighbourhood’ online consultation tools

Reykjavik, the cBetter-Reykjavik-logoapital of Iceland, aims to enhance citizen participation by developing two dedicated online platforms.

Better Reykjavik is an online consultation forum where the locals can submit, discuss, and prioritise ideas about the municipality’s public services and administration. Each month, the top-rated ideas are processed by the council ‘s standing committees.

Once the feasibility and costs of each project have been assessed, citizens are invited to vote on them in My Neighbourhood, another tool that enables them to participate in the annual budgeting process.

Since its launch in 2010, Better Reykjavik has inspired more than 70,000 people to propose and discuss over 4,500 ideas. To date, 420 ideas have been approved by citizens via My Neighbourhood.

The city of Reykjavik operates these websites jointly with the Citizens Foundation (www.citizens.is), a non-profit organisation dedicated to encouraging citizen participation in governance.

Further information about Reykjavik’s cooperative initiative is available at http://reykjavik.is/en/better-reykjavik-0.

Contact person: Kristinn Jon Olafsson, project manager, Reykjavik smart city: Kristin.jon.olafsson[at]reykjavik.is

Utrecht’s smart mobility project: ‘Traffic lights hotline’

Utrecht, the fourth largest city in the Netherlands, is often referred to as a cyclist’s paradise. This rapidly growing city faces new and unexpected challenges directly linked to its bike-friendly policies. Every day, upwards of 100,000 cyclists ride across the city, sometimes even causing traffic congestion … for their fellow cyclists! Many of them feel that the city’s traffic lights could be better configured, and that some are actually not necessary at all.

hotlinePursuing a smart approach to mobility, Utrecht municipality launched, in February 2015, Traffic Lights Hotline, an online service asking residents to report traffic lights that could be deactivated (for part of the day) or reprogrammed. Nearly 5,000 reports have been received.

The hotline has since become a permanent service, enabling intelligent traffic flow management and improving traffic safety.

The hotline is available at http://mobiliteitsdata-utrecht.nl/verkeer/vri/ (in Dutch only).

Contact person: Muriel Pels, advisor international cooperation and EU funding affairs; m.pels[at]utrecht.nl

 

Zaragoza Citizen Card’

Zaragoza, capital of the Spanish region of Aragon, is located halfway between Barcelona and Madrid. It counts among Europe’s first open-source cities. Zaragoza Citizen Card is a multi-service smart card that can be used for accessing public services and facilities, including payment processing services.

To date, over half of Zaragoza’s atarjetaciudadanadult population have already applied for such an ’all-in-one’ digital key to more than twenty municipal services, including public transport, parking, public libraries, swimming pools, and wifi.

This card is only one example for Zaragoza’s collaborative approach to smart city transformation. In addition to saving costs and making citizens’ life easier, the card comes complete with an open public API (application programming interface), which can be used by citizens to ask questions, and which generates data that can be fed into the city’s innovation ecosystem.

Contact person: Daniel Sarasa Funes, smart city programme manager:  dsarasa[at]zaragoza.es

 

With the EIP-SCC General Assembly taking place in Eindhoven at the end of May, Smart Cities are now at the top of the European political agenda. Smart Cities are a focus area for Horizon 2020 and many projects have already been piloted and implemented across the Union.

Next challenge for smart cities will be to open a European market for interoperable solutions and common procurement specifications. That is the idea now defended by Roberto Viola, head of the European Commission’s DG-CONNECT. Read his opinion by clicking here

M. Viola announces that, in November 2016 and under the EU Urban Agenda, “as part of [its] commitment to improve access to information, advice and investments, the Commission will launch a special portal for cities. It will provide a single, transparent, entry-point for details on EU policies and funding opportunities for cities, including access to finance and technical help from the European investment advisory hub”.

Cities will also be able to find new substantial amounts of money from regional policy funds that have now become available to local authorities as well to invest in infrastructures and innovative services.

 

Roberto Viola, head of DG-CONNECT (European Commission)

The original article was published on The Parliament Magazine (20.04.2016)

 

In an interview published in the EU Smart Cities Information System’s April 2016 newsletter, Nikolaos Kontinakis gives an insight into his motives and experiences as project coordinator for the knowledge society and smart cities projects of EUROCITIES, Brussels, and talks about his perception of ‘sustainable smart cities’.

Nikolaos Kontinakis coordinates the Green Digital Charter initiative and EUROCITIES work for the development of a performance measurement framework for smart cities under the CITYkeys project and the promotion of green ICT via the ICTfootprint.eu project. He also represents EUROCITIES in the SSCC-CG of CEN/CENELEC. For the last 15 years, he has worked as a project coordinator and researcher in the areas of ICT, energy policy and the smart and sustainable development of local authorities.

Read the full interview on the EU Smart Cities Information System’s website: www.smartcities-infosystem.eu

In a series of articles, the ICLEI (Local Governments for Sustainability) Smart Cities team intends to feed what they call the ‘Smart City 2.0 debate’.

Paradoxes Of A Smart City – Part 1: Efficiency Increase Vs Absolute Consumption

Taken from ICLEI blog

 

Based on three smart cities case-studies, among which Barcelona and Amsterdam, they arrived to the conclusion that smart cities are not only about technology but rather about an integrated definition of sustainable development strategies.

Through a series of articles, the team will therefore try to address questions arising from ‘smart city paradoxes’. The first article focuses on the Jevons Paradox, describing “a phenomenon where a system may use more energy or resources, or generate more emissions overall, when it becomes more efficient”.

 

 

The original article, written by Bohyun Kim (ICLEI World Secretariat in Bonn) can be read by clicking on the following link: http://bit.ly/25vL2nd

 

On 1-2 June 2016, the ICLEI conference at Metropolitain Solutions 2016 will take place in Berlin, Germany.

More information on this event are available here.

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The EIP-SCC Citizen Focus Action Cluster is organizing a webinar on the engagement of citizens through co-creation and co-design tools. The webinar will take place on March 18th from 13:00 to 14:00.

Pursuing sustainable and citizen-centric smart cities means not only starting from citizens’ needs but also leveraging on socially-driven innovations where citizens act as creators and drivers of socio-technical change. This is why co-design and co-creation are receiving increased attention in the debate on urban innovation and smart cities.  From being ‘objects’ whose needs are analysed and detected to meet their demands, citizens become active subjects of smart civic movements and constitute the backbone of smart cities. From an industry perspective these developments can lead to greater interaction with customers and their expectations in order to design more meaningful and marketable user experiences. City administrations rely on innovative e-government platforms to grasp citizens’ demands and rejuvenate dialogue and participation.

The Citizen Focus Action Cluster is focusing one of its streams of activities on reviewing and analysing  methods and good practices for making smart cities human-centric, meeting citizens’ needs and leveraging citizen-led innovations: Initiative#1 investigates co-design and co-creation as tools for enhancing social inclusion and participation. Through this webinar it aims at sharing the most recent developments in this field from a multi-stakeholder perspective, highlighting current research and best practice on these topics.

Citizen Focus Action Cluster will chair and open the webinar leading the discussion through the interventions of speakers such as Mercè Graell, from Design IT and Frank Kresin, from Waag. Anne Deltour, from DG Connect will give the conclusions.

For further information on the programme, visit the event.

For registrations, click here.

To reach the original article, click here.

Turin, Italy

Turin, Italy

Following the success of earlier events in the series, SEB-16, the Eighth International Conference on Sustainability in Energy and Buildings, organised by the Politecnico di Torino in partnership with KES International, will take place in the vibrant city of Turin, from 11 to 13 September 2016.

 

You are kindly invited to submit a paper and to participate to the Invited Session on “Energy Smart Cities and Communities: from performance indicators to real district-scale example”. Here you may find the invited session summary.

 

Full papers will be reviewed by the IPC and, if accepted and presented, they may be published after the conference in Elsevier’s Energy Procedia (ISSN; 1876-6101), open access journal, available in ScienceDirect and submitted to be indexed/abstracted in Scopus (tbc).

Provisional deadlines are:

  • Submission of Papers for Review (complete papers, not abstracts) : 15 April 2016
  • Notification of Acceptance: 30 May 2016
  • Upload of Final Camera-Ready Publication Files: 30 June 2016

 

If you are interested, please contact Francesco Causone, Chairman of the Invited Session.

Francesco Causone, PhD
Assistant Professor
Politecnico di Milano
Department of Energy
Via Lambruschini, 4a – 20156 Milano (Italy)
T: +39 02 2399 8621
M: +39 366 693 5028
F: +39 02 2399 3913
E: Francesco.causone@polimi.it

 

More information is available on http://seb-16.sustainedenergy.org/

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The partnership will help Bristol Is Open create the world’s first open programmable city with a citywide digital fabric

NEC Corporation, a provider of information technology services and products, has announced the signing of a long-term partnership agreement with Bristol Is Open, a smart city initiative in the UK.

Bristol Is Open is a joint venture between Bristol City Council and the University of Bristol, and aims to create the world’s first open, programmable city to support the creation of innovative new smart services for people, business and academia. This will pave the way for improvements in a wide range of services, including traffic congestion, waste management, entertainment, e-democracy, and energy supply.

“NEC is particularly drawn to the work of Bristol Is Open because we share their belief that new levels of pervasive digital connectivity are required to enable the smart city of the future,” said Dejan Bojic, Smart Solutions Programme Director, NEC Europe. “NEC is pleased to support and endorse Bristol Is Open’s development of software defined networks as a foundation behind Internet of Things and Big Data solutions needed to address critical issues faced by urban communities around the world.”

The partnership helps NEC to demonstrate new approaches to pervasive digital connectivity at city-scale, combined with its aim to create new social value for the changing world of tomorrow. It helps Bristol Is Open to further its goal of creating the world’s first open programmable city with a citywide digital fabric that includes fibre in the ground, an experimental wireless mile, and a Radio Frequency mesh that covers the vast majority of the city.

“Bristol’s approach to smart cities has gone deep into the architecture of network provision, creating a technology agnostic, heterogeneous, software defined approach to connectivity, at city scale,” said Paul Wilson, Managing Director of Bristol Is Open. “This elastic approach is addressing many of the architecturally-rigid constraints experienced in today’s commercially available networks. As we bring our infrastructure live throughout 2016 we are looking forward to demonstrating new levels of connectivity that will be the hallmarks of the smart city of the future.”

NEC, Bristol Is Open and Bristol City Council are part of the €25 million REPLICATE Lighthouse City consortium, alongside San Sebastián and Florence. The consortium will create integrated smart city solutions to tackle urban problems such as traffic congestion, poor air quality and unsustainable energy use. The consortium has received funding as part of the Smart Cities and Communities funding call, through the EU’s Horizon 2020 innovation programme.

 

More information here (12th February 2016 Nick Michell) 

eu-china_iconsIt has been officially announced: High-level delegations, cities, industry and stakeholders from EU and China will meet in Brussels on the 29th June.

This day, as part of the EU-China summit, the EU-China Urbanisation Partnership forum will take place. This will be in the afternoon while in the morning of the same day, the 29th , the European Commission will be organizing a sub forum with focus on EU-China “Smart Cities”. More sub-fora for “Sustainable cities” and “Sustainable mobility” will be organised in parallel.

In a few days more information and the opening of the registration will be announced.

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smartcities-logoThe EIP Smart Cities and Communities Market Place is delighted to announce its upcoming General Assembly to be held on the 21st May in Berlin (Germany), at the Metropolitan Solutions Trade Fair 2015.

The event is addressed to all the partners of the Action Clusters of the Market Place, allowing them to contribute to the discussions on their objectives and potential work plans.

However, there will be a public session in the morning open to general public during which the latest developments and plans for the Partnership will be presented.

The registration form is already open.

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logo_enA new call for proposals for Smart Cities and Communities solutions integrating energy, transport and ICT through lighthouse projects under Horizon 2020 (SCC-01-2015) will open on 10 December 2014 (deadline date for submitting proposals is 5 May 2015).

The information day will take place in the morning and will:

  • Inform participants about the call objectives, requirements and specificities
  • Provide relevant insights and lessons learnt from the 2014 SCC-01 call.

In the afternoon, a brokerage event will provide a chance for people to discuss, exchange ideas, network and meet potential partners to create new or strengthen existing consortia. Participation in the event is free of charge but registration is compulsory and applications will be dealt with on a “first come, first served” basis.

The registration is already open and will remain open until 10 January 2015.

For those not able to attend in person web-streaming will be provided. The agenda of the event and other relevant information will be uploaded in http://bit.ly/1y8S4y4.

Location: Building Charlemagne, Rue De La Loi 170, Brussels 1040

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Time is fast approaching in the lead-up to the NiCE project’s first Roadshow: Green Digital Charter for Smart Cities: enabling technologies for energy efficiency.

The Roadshow will take place on Wednesday 31 October, within the framework of the Smart Cities Exhibition hosted by the City of Bologna from 29-31 October.

This Roadshow will offer an occasion for Green Digital Charter signatories and interested cities to network with each other, European Institutions and industries. It is also a chance to increase the visibility and profile of their cities. Last but not least, the event presents an opportunity for cities to demonstrate their commitment to reducing their carbon footprint using ICT by signing the Green Digital Charter! (More information on the benefits of becoming a signatory and how to become a signatory.)

The event will be divided into three sessions in the morning before moving to the exhibition closure in the afternoon:

  • Keynote speech delivered by Pier Paolo Maggiora on the Smart City: the infrastructure of the future
  • Plenary session on the subject of the Covenant of Mayors and Sustainable Action Plans: the path towards smart cities                                                                                                                                                                                                           including: Green Digital Charter signature ceremony 
  • Green Digital Charter for Smart Cities: enabling technology for energy savings, with speakers from local authorities as well as technical experts

Please click here to view a draft agenda of the event, which includes links to the registration pages for the different sessions.

More information:

 

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This brokerage event on 11 July 2012 offered an opportunity for EUROCITIES member cities to develop consortia and project ideas ahead of the Smart Cities call for proposals in the 2013 Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) Work Programme, expected to be published on 10 July. This event was organised back-to-back with the Commission’s Smart Cities & Communities stakeholder platform event on 10 July 2012. It also complemented the official European Commission FP7 Energy Research information day, which will took place on 4 July 2012.

The event gave participants the opportunity to:

  • Learn more about the call from a representative from the Commission
  • Meet other European cities interested in the call
  • Network with project partners from all over Europe in view of developing joint projects
  • Interact with experts from EUROCITIES office for fine-tuning your project idea

During the event participants were able to present their city profile/project idea, which contributed to proactive matchmaking between potential projects.

Download: visit the “Document from events” resource session to download agenda and presentations of the training

 

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