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At 14:00 CET on 14 March, EUROCITIES hosted a public webinar on citizen participation and co-creation in smart cities, where the experiences gathered from the Sharing Cities and Green Digital Charter projects were shared with the participants.

WATCH THE WEBINAR
Reykjavik 
Better-Reykjavik-logo

Reykjavik

[PRESENTATION]

Magnus Y. Josefsson presented the Better Reykjavik collaborative online platform, through which citizens can submit policy proposals to the municipal government.  ‘Better Reykjavik‘ was among the shortlisted projects in the “Citizen participation & impact on society” category of the 2016 edition of the GDC Awards.

Find out more about Reykjavik’s SMART projects and priorities here.

Milan 
Milan

Milan

[PRESENTATION]

During a recent peer-learning visit organised in Milan in the frame of the Sharing Cities project, ‘fellow’ city representatives heard a presentation about the host city’s civic crowdfunding practices.

Find out more about Milan’s SMART projects and priorities here.

About Sharing Cities

Sharing Cities (www.sharingcities.eu) ‘lighthouse’ programme is a proving ground for a better, common approach to making smart cities a reality. By foestering international collaboration between industry and cities, the project seeks to develop affordable, integrated, commercial-scale smart city solutions with a high market potential. The project partners work in close cooperation with the European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities (EIP-SCC) and with other ‘lighthouse’ consortia. Sharing Cities offers a framework for citizen engagement and collaboration at local level, thereby strenghtening trust between cities and citizens. The project draws on €24 million in EU funding. It aims to trigger €500 million in investment and to engage over 100 municipalities across Europe.

 

 

 

OpenYourCity.com

This article has been originally published on OpenYourCity.com under a Creative Commons license. Some rights reserved

“If I were to decipher the message that 2017 is bringing, I would say that data sharing and co-creation will certainly boost urban innovation in the forthcoming years. And that, in Zaragoza, we have some interesting tools to make it happen:

  • our smart Citizen Card, our “de facto” digital platform upon which we can build all sorts of services, from gamification to citizen participation
  • our Open Urban Lab, the co-creation lab of the city, located at the very core of Zaragoza’s flagship innovation hub “Etopia Center for Arts and Technology
  • a thriving civic and innovation ecosystem and a program “100 Ideas ZGZ” conceived to set bottom-up ideas in motion, using the city as an innovation platform

The good news started in Luxembourg. After pitching the Citizen Card in late January on the Big Data Info Days on Horizon 2020 we are overwhelmed by the number of agents from either industry and research arena that have proposed to partner with us in big data-related H2020 calls. Almost simultaneously, four groups of design students from the University of Zaragoza presented four innovative ideas for new services on the Citizen Card. They had been working on them for three months both in the classroom and in the Lab.

A week later we took a plane to Brussels: on Jan, 25th Zaragoza’s Citizen Card received the Green Digital Charter (GDC) 2016 Award on ‘Citizen participation and impact on society’. During the conference ‘Cities in Transition – the role of digital in shaping our future cities’ held in Brussels we had the opportunity to present our current and future data policy and discuss it with an engaged audience from government and academia. Take two concepts already developed in these blog’s pages: Big (open) Data, and Data Sharing.

From left to right: Daniel Sarasa, Carlos Alocen and Gerardo Lahuerta after receiving the Green Digital Charter (GDC) 2016 Award on 'Citizen participation & impact on society'

From left to right: Daniel Sarasa, Carlos Alocen and Gerardo Lahuerta after receiving the Green Digital Charter (GDC) 2016 Award on ‘Citizen participation & impact on society’, Brussels, 25 January 2017

We need European funding to materialize these and other ideas, so we’ve been working very hard with the team on several European proposals for using data to spark and guide the co-creation of new public services. We have already tested this principle within the project CITYkeys, where data has allowed us to identify gaps and opportunities for new transport services: that’s how the future network of bicycle parking spots started to be designed. A path, that of the co-creation of new public services based on data insights, that we intend to develop further.

On Feb, 6th we enrolled on a learning trip to beautiful Cascais (Portugal) to join the “Smart Life Incubator” think tank. We were ‘locked’ by the outstanding TM Forum staff alongside other city policy makers from Tokyo, Liverpool, Nice, Porto, Saint Quentin, Cascais and Utrecht. It was an intense 3-day working session focused on addressing urban challenges through innovation and cooperation between stakeholders. We dealt with problems such as mobility, talent attraction, unemployment, on-line services,… We shared strategies to bring deprived public space back to life, or to improve city response in case of catastrophe. Surprisingly, data sharing was identified as a common enabling vector for most of the challenges. The bad news is that no one seems to know how to make it happen without compromising, either legitimate organization assets or personal privacy: the relationship between big data and governments is still heavily cluttered.

So while everybody talks about co-creation, there is an astonishingly small number of succes stories out there. Most projects, like the “Co-creating responsive urban spaces” initiative in Amsterdam, are just starting.  And data sharing is something we all think should be happening (for the sake of humanity, right?) but that no one has seen yet. In my Master on City Sciences’ thesis I pointed out that there are gigantic organizational and behavioural (psychological) barriers that block the way. As more projects on co-creation start in the following years, and small scale urban data sharing examples are being built, we expect that a whole new body of knowledge about the subject will appear. This knowledge, of course, will blossom on the urban ground, since it is the natural environment where people’s ideas and big (urban) data can turn into solutions.

The story of co-creation and data sharing is just beginning. We’ll be here to write it.”

Daniel Sarasa Funes is urban innovation planner and Smart City Program Manager at Zaragoza City Council. He is co-author of Zaragoza’s digital agenda 2012-2015 “Towards a Smart Citizenship” and co-editor of OpenYourCity.com

The 4th ICTFOOTPRINT free webinar held 23 February 2017 focused on ICT energy efficiency Calculation tools and sustainable ICT insights on energy services.

 Agenda

speakers of ICTFOOTPRINT.eu 4th webinar – 23 February, 15:00 CET

  • Thomas Corvaiser (CEO of Greenspector) introduced the concept of software eco-design, and told us how it helps lowering the consumption of IT resources while preserving performance and user experience.
  • Frédéric Croisson (Deloitte Sustainability) showcased the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu Self-Assessment Tool for Services (SAT-S), a useful, quick and easy-to-use tool that calculate the carbon footprint of your ICT services. The tool helps users not only to make informed decisions about how to make an ICT service sustainable, but also discover the impact of ICT devices & activities in terms of Green House Gas emissions and primary energy consumption. (SAT-S will be launched very soon).
  • Karen Robinson shared some sustainable ICT practices and presented the save@work initiative, which encourages public sector employees to come together in teams to reduce the energy consumption of their building by making small changes to their everyday energy consuming behaviours.

The webinar was moderated by Silvana Muscella, project coordinator of ICTFOOTPRINT.eu and CEO of Trust-IT Services.

WATCH THE WEBINAR

More information on ICTFOOTPRINT.eu website.ICTfootprint.eu

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A ‘smart city’ is a place where digital technologies translate into better public services for citizens, better use of resources and less impact on the environment. With this vision in mind, the EU has been investing in ICT research and innovation (in particular through its Horizon 2020 funding programme) and developing policies as well as partnerships, such as the European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities (EIP-SCC), to speed the deployment of innovative solutions.

Sixteen cross-domain projects are presented in our 2016 collection of case studies. Three of these have been shortlisted by our jury of experts, and one will win the 2016 GDC Award ‘Creation of European added-value’on 25 January.

The three shortlisted projects in this second category are:

  • Bristol’s REPLICATE pilot
  • Lisbon’s BESOS (Building Energy Decision Support Systems for Smart Cities) project
  • Zagreb’s Energy Week

 

Bristol’s REPLICATE project engages citizens in achieving sustainable goals

In 2015, Bristol was the first UK city to receive the European Green Capital Award in recognition of its impressive investment plans for transports and energy, in particular renewables, by 2020.

Bristol is one of threeREPLICATE logo + flag lead cities (’lighthouses’) of REPLICATE (REnaissance of PLaces with Innovative Citizenship And Technology), an EU research and development project aiming to deploy integrated energy, mobility, and ICT solutions in city districts. Bristol has chosen the Ashely, Easton and Lawrence Hill neighbourhood partnership area as its target district.

Bristol’s approach focuses on citizens and addresses a broad range of socio-economic and environmental challenges faced by the city. First, its core innovation is the development of an energy demand management system that can holistically monitor and control energy use in 150 connected homes.

The city is developing a number of other projects and measures that would help increase energy efficiency, promote sustainable mobility, and encourage citizens to change their behaviour.

 

More information at http://replicate-project.eu/bristol/

Contact person: Luke Loveridge, programme manager: luke.loveridge[at]bristol.gov.uk

 

Lisbon’s BESOS project fosters public-private energy efficiency cooperation

Lisbon, capital of Portugal and one of the oldest cities in the world, is very active in European cooperation initiatives and smart city projects. A ‘lighthouse’ member of the Sharing Cities project, Lisbon’s smart city strategy has proved that bringing stakeholders together can provide considerable support for efforts to ensure the sustainability and replicability of solutions developed in pilot projects.

BESOSlogo

Between October 2013 and September 2016, the BESOS (Build Energy Decision Support Systems for Smart Cities) project developed an advanced, integrated energy management system.The project targeted two main groups of stakeholders: infrastructure owners (e.g. municipalities) and operators. This public-private partnership developed a trustworthy open platform, through which partners can share data and services among themselves, as well as with third-party applications.

These valuable data flows enable the design and development of higher-level applications capable of processing data in real timeand feeding analysed data analysis to the city’s energy services.

Lisbon and Barcelona have already tested the BESOS approach.

More information at http://besos-project.eu/

 

Contact person: Francisco Gonçalves, project coordinator, franciscogoncalves[a]lisboaenova.org

 

Zagreb Energy Week: “Development we don’t want to stop but pollution we can”

Zagreb_Energy_Week_2016Over the past seven years, Zagreb Energy Week has become of the city’s flagship events. Held in the month of May under the slogan ‘Development we don’t want to stop but pollution we can’, the organisers call for joint actions that contribute to the implementation of sustainable urban development projects and the preservation of natural resources for future generations.

Financed by the city budget, Zagreb Energy Week is jam-packed with conferences, expert meetings, open-door days, seminars, classes, and workshops dedicated to energy and the environment. These activities allow for rich dialogue and interaction among the experts, and raise citizens’ concern about the environment.

Contact persons: Vlatka Samarinec and Maja Sunjic, expert advisors: vlatka.samarinec[at]zagreb.hr and maja.sunjic[at]zagreb.hr

Since there cannot be a smart city without smart citizens, the award winner in the first category will be a project that has successfully involved citizens and/or other civil society stakeholders; has adopted a bottom-up approach; and is expected to tackle, or has already tackled, local societal challenges.

Of the 14 projects nominated in this category, three stand a good chance of winning the award:

  • Reykjavik’s Better Reykjavik and My Neighbourhood e-participation projects
  • Utrecht’s Traffic lights hotline
  • Zaragoza’s Citizen Card

‘Better Reykjavik’ and ‘My Neighbourhood’ online consultation tools

Reykjavik, the cBetter-Reykjavik-logoapital of Iceland, aims to enhance citizen participation by developing two dedicated online platforms.

Better Reykjavik is an online consultation forum where the locals can submit, discuss, and prioritise ideas about the municipality’s public services and administration. Each month, the top-rated ideas are processed by the council ‘s standing committees.

Once the feasibility and costs of each project have been assessed, citizens are invited to vote on them in My Neighbourhood, another tool that enables them to participate in the annual budgeting process.

Since its launch in 2010, Better Reykjavik has inspired more than 70,000 people to propose and discuss over 4,500 ideas. To date, 420 ideas have been approved by citizens via My Neighbourhood.

The city of Reykjavik operates these websites jointly with the Citizens Foundation (www.citizens.is), a non-profit organisation dedicated to encouraging citizen participation in governance.

Further information about Reykjavik’s cooperative initiative is available at http://reykjavik.is/en/better-reykjavik-0.

Contact person: Kristinn Jon Olafsson, project manager, Reykjavik smart city: Kristin.jon.olafsson[at]reykjavik.is

Utrecht’s smart mobility project: ‘Traffic lights hotline’

Utrecht, the fourth largest city in the Netherlands, is often referred to as a cyclist’s paradise. This rapidly growing city faces new and unexpected challenges directly linked to its bike-friendly policies. Every day, upwards of 100,000 cyclists ride across the city, sometimes even causing traffic congestion … for their fellow cyclists! Many of them feel that the city’s traffic lights could be better configured, and that some are actually not necessary at all.

hotlinePursuing a smart approach to mobility, Utrecht municipality launched, in February 2015, Traffic Lights Hotline, an online service asking residents to report traffic lights that could be deactivated (for part of the day) or reprogrammed. Nearly 5,000 reports have been received.

The hotline has since become a permanent service, enabling intelligent traffic flow management and improving traffic safety.

The hotline is available at http://mobiliteitsdata-utrecht.nl/verkeer/vri/ (in Dutch only).

Contact person: Muriel Pels, advisor international cooperation and EU funding affairs; m.pels[at]utrecht.nl

 

Zaragoza Citizen Card’

Zaragoza, capital of the Spanish region of Aragon, is located halfway between Barcelona and Madrid. It counts among Europe’s first open-source cities. Zaragoza Citizen Card is a multi-service smart card that can be used for accessing public services and facilities, including payment processing services.

To date, over half of Zaragoza’s atarjetaciudadanadult population have already applied for such an ’all-in-one’ digital key to more than twenty municipal services, including public transport, parking, public libraries, swimming pools, and wifi.

This card is only one example for Zaragoza’s collaborative approach to smart city transformation. In addition to saving costs and making citizens’ life easier, the card comes complete with an open public API (application programming interface), which can be used by citizens to ask questions, and which generates data that can be fed into the city’s innovation ecosystem.

Contact person: Daniel Sarasa Funes, smart city programme manager:  dsarasa[at]zaragoza.es

 

The European Assistance for Innovation Procurement (EAFIP) is a three year initiative of the European Commission for the support of public procurers who want to start and implement innovation procurements of ICT-based solutions.

Through EAFIP, EU Commission collects data from public procurements, develops toolkits on innovation procurement and opens calls to fund public procurers’ innovative projects.

The last call for EAFIP Assistance is now open until 17th of April 2016 for applications. Candidates will apply to receive free hands-on and tailored support to develop their own Pre-Commercial Procurement (PCP) or Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions (PPI). The EAFIP initiative is open to all public procurers across EU. Up to 12 of them will be selected and provided with a complete assistance (also legal assistance) in the start-up and implementation of an innovation procurement project. To submit an application, eligible candidates only need to fill in an online survey before 17th April 2016.

Horizon 2020 seeks to improve the support for groups of public procurers either in PCP, research and development on procurement before the market, or in PPI, integration for innovative commercial solutions in the market.

European procurers interested in PPI may check the Procurement of Innovation Platform, a hub for information regarding innovation procurement supported by European Commission.

 

Fore more info, click here.

 

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Smartspaces_Logo_compressedThe ‘Guide for Replication‘ presents how Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) can be utilised to improve energy efficiency (EE) in non-residential and residential buildings.

The Guide has been developed over 5 years and is based on numerous projects including over 35 pilot sites. The content is continuously being updated and has been featured by several prominent energy associations including EnergyCities and Eurocities.

The reader can follow the Guide following the necessary Phases or from the viewpoint of individual Stakeholders. Setting the Scene explains technical basics and the different concepts in more detail. Phases distinct necessary steps for successful development, implementation and operation.Stakeholders chapters selectively include content relevant for the stakeholder in question. Short pages are provided for specific (but selected) Problems.

Checklists and key lessons learnt are highlighted and introduced in context. This includes the References to specific projects and pilot sites for which detail including live portals and videos are provided. Comprehensive checklists, glossaries, tools for download, etc. are collected also in the Technical Documentation and in the Annex.

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Time is fast approaching in the lead-up to the NiCE project’s first Roadshow: Green Digital Charter for Smart Cities: enabling technologies for energy efficiency.

The Roadshow will take place on Wednesday 31 October, within the framework of the Smart Cities Exhibition hosted by the City of Bologna from 29-31 October.

This Roadshow will offer an occasion for Green Digital Charter signatories and interested cities to network with each other, European Institutions and industries. It is also a chance to increase the visibility and profile of their cities. Last but not least, the event presents an opportunity for cities to demonstrate their commitment to reducing their carbon footprint using ICT by signing the Green Digital Charter! (More information on the benefits of becoming a signatory and how to become a signatory.)

The event will be divided into three sessions in the morning before moving to the exhibition closure in the afternoon:

  • Keynote speech delivered by Pier Paolo Maggiora on the Smart City: the infrastructure of the future
  • Plenary session on the subject of the Covenant of Mayors and Sustainable Action Plans: the path towards smart cities                                                                                                                                                                                                           including: Green Digital Charter signature ceremony 
  • Green Digital Charter for Smart Cities: enabling technology for energy savings, with speakers from local authorities as well as technical experts

Please click here to view a draft agenda of the event, which includes links to the registration pages for the different sessions.

More information:

 

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The City of Bologna, signatory of the Green Digital Charter since February 2010, will host the first Green Digital Charter Roadshow next 31st October:

Green Digital Charter for smart cities

Enabling technologies for energy efficiency

 

Roadshows are visibility and networking events organised under the NiCE project with the purpose of increasing the visibility of the Green Digital Charter and enabling the fostering of partnerships between signatory cities, European Institutions and other relevant stakeholders. (More information)

The first of a series of three events, this roadshow is organised by the City of Bologna in cooperation with ForumPA and with the support of the NiCE project consortium. It set in context of the Smart Cities Exhibition taking place in Bologna on 29-31 October and it will focus on the role of ICT to trigger and support cities in tackling climate change.

More information and detailed programme coming soon.

 

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