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The Smart Cities Information System (SCIS) is launching its podcast channel! From now on, Anthony Colclough from EUROCITIES will inform you on a monthly basis about different smart city related topics. In Urban Reverb, he will interview anyone who is either directly involved in smart city projects (such as politicians and engineers) or who is somehow affected by the outccomes of innovative and smart solutions (such as tenants).

Jump on the first episode and listen experts from Amsterdam, Utrecht and Helsinki explaining what ‘bidirectional chargers‘ are, or why ‘vehicle to grid‘ is the future of mobility in town.

SCIS podcast channel : https://www.smartcities-infosystem.eu/newsroom/podcasts

 

This article was originally published on mySMARTLife project website.

The first two-way charging point in Finland was installed in the Suvilahti district in Helsinki in connection with mySMARTLife project partner Helen’s solar power plant and electricity storage facility. The V2G charging point enables not only charging of an electric vehicle, but also using it as an electricity storage unit and for balancing of the electricity system.

mySMARTLifeThe public two-way charging point is implemented in cooperation between Helen, Liikennevirta, a Finnish operator of charging stations for electric cars, and Nissan. So far, there are no similar charging points in public use anywhere else in Europe.

In the future, the owner of an electric vehicle can utilise the vehicle’s battery as an energy storage unit at home with a two way charger and also take part in the balancing of the electricity market and gain benefits as part of the service.

Electric vehicle drivers’ participation in balancing the grid will be important when electric vehicles on the one hand, and solar and wind power plants on the other hand will become more common. Therefore, batteries of all sizes, i.e. electricity storage units, are needed.

Control systems that optimise the entities will also be necessary in order to maintain a balance between electricity generation and consumption.

Follow the project on Twitter @mySMARTLife_eu

 
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https://www.mysmartlife.eu

Lighthouse project funded under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, mySMARTlife (https://mysmartlife.eu/) brings together 28 partners from 7 countries to build a new kind of environment-friendly cities by reducing CO2 emissions and increasing the use of renewable energies.

Objectives: Smart City – Smart Economy – Smart People
  • Use of renewable energy sources
  • Inclusive cities
  • Involving citizens
  • Digitalisation of cities through urban platforms

More than 150 actions are being demonstrated in 3 ‘lighthouse’ cities (Nantes, Hamburg and Helsinki). Their experiences will then be passed on to four ‘follower’ cities (Bydgoszcz, Varna, Rijeka and Palencia) to set up their own urban transformation plans.

Nantes, Helsinki and Rijeka are three signatory cities of the Green Digital Charter. Rijeka was awarded last year best GDC project on ‘Promoting open & interoperable solutions’ (for the iURBAN project).

Follow the project

mySMARTLife newsletter is published twice a year, giving you regular updates about the latest developments in the Lighthouse and Follower cities.  To receive it automatically in your mailbox, register through this link: mysmartlife.eu/newsletter/

Discover the first newsletter at https://mysmartlife.eu/newsletter/newsletter-2017-1/

The project is also on Twitter (@mySMARTLife_eu) and LinkedIn (closed group).

(updated on 28 August 2017)

Four GDC signatories among finalists for the iCapital Award 2017

iCapital poster – European Commission website

Among all ten cities shortlisted for the iCapital Award 2017, four have signed the Green Digital Charter. Their strategy? Foster the use of digital solutions to improve quality of life in cities and increase participation in cities.

  • Helsinki – for its world-class education and IT culture that fosters innovative collaborations among citizens and institutions to jointly tackle urban challenges such as air quality, maritime technology and health-tech.
  • Nice – for its Smart City strategy that offers citizens to engage via the city Innovation Centre in decisions on climate change, healthy ageing, environmental risk and security innovation.
  • Tallinn – for becoming a model of a true “eCity” by digitalising all the city services.
  • Tampere -for its Grow.Smart.Together urban development program, where citizens, universities and businesses are involved in creating smart urban solutions fostering new jobs in the city.

“Tampere is committed to the development of a “city-as-a-platform”-based urban innovation ecosystem. key aims of the new 2017 Tampere Mayoral Program are to strenghten communality and co-creation, and to make Tampere a model city of urban digital economy focusing on citizens’ wellbeing and urban economic competitiveness”. – Lauri Lyly, Mayor of the City of Tampere > More information on Tampere’s application at http://innovationcapital.fi/

After Barcelona (2014) and Amsterdam (2016) (two other signatories), which city will be recognised as the most innovative in Europe?

The European Capital of Innovation 2017 award and a prize of €1 million to scale up innovation activities will go to the city presenting the best innovation ecosystem, with two runners-up to receive a prize of €100 000 each. The winners will be announced on 7 November at the Lisbon Web Summit.

To win the award, cities must prove how they improved the quality of life by:

  • Experimenting with innovative concepts, processes, tools and governance models as a test-bed for innovation
  • Engaging citizens in the innovation process and ensuring the uptake of their ideas
  • Expanding the city’s attractiveness to become a role model for other cities
  • Empowering the local ecosystem through the implementation of innovative practices.

More information can be found at www.ec.europa.eu/icapital

#iCapitalAwards