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Green Digital Charter collection of case studies 2017

24 case-studies for 21 contributing cities: GDC signatories are leading the way in deploying digital solutions to reduce their carbon footprint and improve their citizens’ quality of life. Buildings, energy, transport, e-participation, green ICT, waste management :  this third publication gathers inspiring (and replicable?) solutions. Each case-study has its own person of contact. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with them!

Read our Flipbook at http://bit.ly/2ngXXu4

Or even browse the online book below!

 

This edition is already the third! Access the 2015 and 2016 catalogues on this page : http://bit.ly/GDC-case-studies.

 

GDC Award 2017-copyAmsterdam will be walking away with the GDC 2018 award for the City-ZEN ‘virtual power plant’, a project which puts green energy into the grid and money into residents’ pockets at the same time.

The City-ZEN project not only stabilises the local grid in the neighbourhood but also decreases the societal cost of the energy transition locally” said Jan Willem Eising, project coordinator, accepting the award.

The virtual power plant is an online platform which puts together the solar energy that residents are creating and consuming, storing the surplus locally. This allows residents who are generating their own solar energy in their homes and sell it on the open market! So far, more than 40 households have taken part in the initiative in the Dutch capital’s district of Niew-West.

This project delivered impressively on GDC’s selection criteria by putting citizens at the centre of ICT innovation, enabling them through technology to improve their own quality of life by bring the city closer to its green goals. Most importantly, this engaging method of incentivising solar energy production among citizens is highly reclable – there is little to prevent every city in Europe from implementing their own version of this programme. Indeed, we hope they will!

GDC-Award2017-priceThe jury, which consisted of Miimu Airaksinen (VTT, Finland); Jan Dictus (GOJA Consulting, Austria); and Cristobal Irazoqui (European Commission, DG CNECT), were very impressed with all the case studies submitted to the Green Digital Charter’s annual publication.

Two other projects stood out. Bristol’s REPLICATE project, piloted through 150 ‘smart homes’, is an energy demand management scheme that monitors and controls energy use in order to level out peak demand. Dublin’s iSCAPE project uses ‘passive control systems’ to reduce the impact of air pollution in urban spaces, in combination with policy interventions and creating behavioural changes in citizens’ lifestyle.

The ICT carbon footprint is the amount of carbon generated by the information and communication technology (ICT) sector.

Do you think ICT equals green?

charging-plugsJust as an example, it is estimated that a single email accounts for 4g of CO2 issues. An email with attachment is account for 50g of CO2e. With a broader picture, ICTs account for 8-10% of the European electricity consumption and up to 4% of its carbon emissions. yet, with a wide energy and environmental strategy, up to 15% of global emissions could be saved by 2020, especially in sectors like transport, energy, industry and buildings.

Measurement systems are the first step to tackling energy efficiency

Carbon calculation methodologies are essential tools to assess the carbon footprint of products and services. Only a few are dedicated to measuring energy consumption of digital goods, a gap that the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu project ambitions to tackle.

ICTFOOTPRINT.eu listed the most relevant methodologies for organisations to start adopting the ‘green IT/ICT’ attitude. Find them all by clicking at https://ictfootprint.eu/en/related-tools-services.

ICTfootprint.eu

 

This article was originally published on mysmartlife.eu

The Western part of the demonstration district “Ile de Nantes” is a very busy and touristic entertainment area where many urban developments are implemented in the framework of mySMARTLife. It is a vibrant place ideal for deploying and testing new solutions, in particular in the field of smart lighting.

Currently, Nantes Metropole manages around 95,000 lighting points in the city for an electricity consumption of 45 Gwh per year, an annual electric bill of around 6 Million Euros and annual maintenance and exploitation costs of around 4 Million Euros.

The opportunity of smart lighting

Smart public lighting is an opportunity to respond to changing urban challenges and stakeholders needs as well as to optimise public lighting functioning, maintenance costs and energy efficiency. Therefore, Nantes Metropole aims at designing and implementing a new public lighting concept which will increase smart lighting innovation, optimise lighting costs and reduce energy consumption.

mySMARTLife partner ENGIE designed new smart lighting solutions to respond to the citizens’ and operators’ needs and will deploy them during the first semester of 2018.

Focus on the demonstration area

The demonstration area is divided into 5 zones with specific needs:

Nantes-ile-district1. Due to new buildings, the street “Mail des chantiers” suffers from light and noise nuisance. An innovative concept is needed to solve this issue.

2. The side lane of “Contre allée Mail des chantiers” is currently poorly lightened and needs to be more attractive to encourage people to use it.

3. The lighting in the street “Cité des chantiers” has to be reduced and rearranged as to guide citizens to the esplanade.

4. “Quai des Antilles” is a highly frequented zone with a need for a very efficient lighting.

5. The street “Esplanade des riveurs” has a need for switching on/off the lights according to specific events.

New efficient solutions by ENGIE

led-lights-1To tackle these issues, different solutions will be implemented, such as the creation of a lighting path that will be deployed by ENGIE, the French electricity company. To encourage people to use this path, new efficient LED lights will be installed with Gobo image projection in the area of “Contre Allée Mail des Chantiers”. Besides, ENGIE will install new LED lights with presence detection and dimming option in the area of “Mail des Chantiers” and “Cité des Chantiers” to encourage people to walk on the side lane of the parallel path in the evening. All light points will be controlled by a remote management system in real time. The operator will also monitor lights e. g. with an on/off switch functionality for specific events and a dimming option. Operating costs and maintenance plans will be optimised.

ENGIE will also install sensors (probably for measuring air quality and noise as well as cameras to count flows of people and traffic) to investigate interesting use cases. These sensors will communicate with the lighting network. Overall, the replacement of existing lamps by LEDs, dimming and individual lighting points remote management will enable to save 75% of energy and optimise maintenance. This new lighting system will be controlled and monitored through a flexible, open and interoperable multi-system and multi-application Content Management System (CMS). Public lighting energy data will also be integrated into the new Nantes Urban data platform.

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EUROCITIES’ Green Digital Charter/GuiDanCe project is setting up an online training, for cities only, on ‘Energy Efficiency in Data Centres: Lessons Learned from Evaluating Over 200 Public Sector Data Centres in Europe’.

Tuesday 5 December

11:00-12:00 C.E.T (Brussels time)

WATCH THE RECORDING HERE

The session will provide an overview of the lessons learned from the EU H2020-funded EURECA project (https://www.dceureca.eu/). Energy-saving opportunities, barriers to adoption and running cost of facilities are among the areas covered by the training. Some of the material presented will highlight for the first time some interesting results around average running cost of servers in the public sector, IT energy consumption distribution, and key factors affecting energy efficiency beyond PUE. Experience from a city involved in a project will be shared with the audience.

The training is suitable for civil servants including heads of IT’s, CxO’s, data centre managers, Energy managers/officers, sustainability managers/officers, as well as procurers.

Continuous Professional Development: Attendees of the training session will receive an official EURECA / GDC training certificate.

Agenda

11:00 – 11:05 : Introductory remarks, by Rebecca Portail (Green Digital Charter, EUROCITIES)

11:05 – 11:25 : ‘Making the Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Data Centres: Lessons Learned from Evaluating Over 200 Public Sector Data Centres in Europe’, by Dr. Rabih Bashroush, coordinator of the EURECA project.

11:25 – 11:45: ‘Northern Ireland exploit datacentre and cloud services to deliver better citizen services’, by Caron Alexander, Director of Digital Shared Services at Department of Finance (Northern Ireland)

11:45- 11:55 : Q&A

11:55 – 12:00 : Closing remarks

 

Our speakers:

Rabih-Bashroush-pictureDr. Rabih Bashroush is the Coordinator of the H2020 EURECA project and the Director of the Enterprise Computing research group (http://bit.ly/2ruEu8b) at the University of East London. Before joining UEL, he spent 10 years at the Queen’s University Belfast in various roles. He held visiting scientist positions at Carnegie Mellon University (USA), Philips Research Labs (Netherlands), and Danfoss Power Electronics (Denmark). In 2016, he was appointed as the coordinator of the EU Commission DG CONNECT Smart Cities Research Cluster (https://www.smartcitiescluster.eu/) on Energy Efficiency in Data Centers.

He serves on the CEN/CENELEC/ETSI Coordination Group on Green Data Centers; the BSI TCT/7/3 Telecommunications; Installation requirements: Facilities and infrastructures – CEN/CENELEC TC215; and the BSI ST/46 ISO SC 39 Sustainability For and By IT standardisation committees. He served on the EU Commission Expert Working Group for Best Environmental Practice in the Telecommunication and ICT services sector and the EU Consultation Forum for the EcoDesign legislation for energy efficient Servers. Dr Bashroush has worked with a number of central and local governments in Europe on energy efficiency projects of varying sizes.

Contact: R.Bashroush@qub.ac.uk

Mrs. Caron Alexander is Director of Digital Shared Services at Department of Finance of the Government of Northern Ireland Government. She will share her experience in collaborating with the EURECA project from the public sector’s side.

Connect with her on LinkedIn.

This article was originally published (in French) here (copyright: Valérie Noriega, Les Petites Affiches)

The metropolitan area of Nice (in French : Métropole Nice Côte d’Azur) just won one of the new European projects funded under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme. This new project, untitled ReUseHeat, will benefit from 4 million € to develop an experimental urban heating and cooling network in the new neighbourhood of Grand Arénas. The project will start immedialy in October 2017.

http://icapital.nicecotedazur.org/ – the official website for Nice candidacy to the iCapital Award 2017

“Nice Côte d’Azur, one of the ten finalist cities for the iCapital Award, a competition awarding the most innovative city in Europe, just won the European project ReUseHeat focused on energy efficiency. (…) Nice Côte d’Azur shares this new success with well-known partners at the European leael: the IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, the London School of Economics, the University of Aalborg and the European network Euroheat and power.

Thanks to ReUseHeat, we will be able to go further on the ground of innovation and energy efficiency. With our industrial partner EDF-DALKIA and the scientific and technical centre on buildings (Centre Scientifique et Technique du Bâtiment), we will develop a heating system exploiting the waste-water management public network in the Metropole. In parallel, we will generate locally a powerful digital tool designed to improve electric grids’ efficiency in the new neighbourghood of Grand Arénas. (…)”

– Christian Estrosi, Mayor of Nice and President of Métropole Nice Côte d’Azur

rauba capeu terrasses des ponchettes quai des etats unis

rauba capeu terrasses des ponchettes quai des etats unis

 

eipscc-v2On 21 September (an equinox day!), the EIP-SCC Action Cluster on Sustainable Districts and Built Environment is co-organising with the Tampere Smart City Program an exceptional field-visit of Tampere’s smart districts:

  • The EU Gugle ‘deep-retrofitting’ project >> see Tampere’s profile at http://eu-gugle.eu/pilot-cities/tampere/
  • The Vuores eco-efficient district, featuring nature-based solutions
  • The Härmälänranta ‘near-zero energy’ district

Full agenda : TAMPERE EIP-SCC field visit invitation

Please note that travel and accommodation must be covered by participants.

Share your interest in participating to the field-visit ideally by 14 September at https://goo.gl/forms/Hf69hvSu05AOOZFz1

 

Register to MINDTREK, Tampere annual smart city event (20-21 September 2017)

Smart Tampere Program by the City of Tampere was launched at Mindtrek last year. At the same period last year (18 October), Anna-Kaisa Ikonen, mayor  of Tampere, signed the Green Digital Charter at a ceremony organised alongside the EUROCITIES mobility and knowledge society forum meeting. [read more at http://bit.ly/2vLlvfV].

Consisting of workshops, inspiring speeches and lightning talks, the Smart City Event at Mindtrek focuses this year on themes such as Smart Mobility, Digital Learning, Smart Lighting and City of Things. Special emphasis is put on the citizen’s perspective.

Agenda and registration are available at http://www.mindtrek.org/2017/smart-city-event-tampere/. Benefit from early-bird tickets (-10%) until 20 August!

 


smarttampereecosystem-red

Access Edinburgh’s city profile by clicking here.

Edinburgh-pixabay

As one of the world’s leading capital cities, ranked second for quality of life in 2017, Edinburgh is experimenting with a number of smart city approaches to improve city sustainability, while driving innovation.

Edinburgh is experimenting with smart waste sensors to better understand patterns of litter across the city. An initial project focused on on-street litter bins, and looked to improve the placement and number of bins, and improve routing efficiency. This would help reduce fuel consumption, as drivers stopped making unnecessary trips to bins that did not need emptying, as well as raising awareness of waste volumes produced in Edinburgh to provide useful data for strategic decision making about waste management in the city. Edinburgh is currently expanding this smart approach to investigate the potential benefits of upscaling to city scale, and potentially to other waste types.

Edinburgh is also currently investing in lighting upgrades, that will replace every lighting column in the city with an energy efficient LED over the next 3 years, as well as providing improvements such as controllable dimming. This infrastructure will also provide an Internet of Things network where additional devices such as traffic or air quality sensors to further improve the city’s data-led approach to sustainability and innovation.


On 30-31 May 2017, Edinburgh hosted the first GuiDanCe ‘workshadowing’ visit. Among other activities, participants from the cities of Oulu and Reykjavik discovered innovative projects developed by the University and Edinburgh Living Lab. Get more insights and pictures through our Storify! Click here.

e-mail signature EUSEW

This year, digital was right on top of the agenda of this EU Sustainable Energy Week: from large-scale smart city projects to citizen-oriented digital services and apps, ICT assume an essential role in maximising energy consumption in our lives.

The Green Digital Charter welcomed participants at its stand of the Networking Village on Thursday 22 June morning (09:00 – 12:30, Résidence Palace). Signed by 52 European cities, the Charter sets energy efficiency as top priority for signatories.

Digital solutions to save energy

GDC signatories are compiling and implementing local and digital strategies to make the most efficient use of ICTs to improve the economic, social and environment wellbeing of their citizens.

This event was the occasion to discover policies and projects implemented by GDC signatory cities in the area of energy efficiency.

#EUSEW17

Environmentally-sound IT and digital applications  

Already today, carbon directly emitted by the ICT sector (datacentres and telecommunication networks) reaches 2% and is expected to double by 2020. Among the priorities of the Digital Agenda for Europe (DAE) is the establishment of a common methodological framework for the measurement of the energy intensity and carbon emissions arising from the production, transport and selling processes of ICT goods, services and networks.

On Wednesday (14:00 – 15:30), DG CONNECT organised a session on ‘nearly zero-emission’ datacentres, testifying of the Commission’s commitment to foster environmental-sound network infrastructures able to sustain the Digital Single Market (DSM). Laura Baracchi (from Trust-IT) presented the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu project and the self-assessment tool developed to raise awareness on the carbon footprint of digital service (SAT-S).

(Smart) cities are important consumers of digital goods and services, and sometimes even owners of IT infrastructures.Leading by example is one of the GDC signatories’ commitments. Indeed, cities can ensure the measurement, transparency and visibility of each city’s use of ICT infrastructure and digital services in terms of carbon footprint.

Read: Abdeluheb Choho, deputy mayor of Amsterdam and chair of EUROCITIES Environment Forum, “Cities are key players in the clean energy transition”, EurActiv, 19.06.2017

EUSEW Networking Village 7

GDC interactive board also approached the rising issue of energy consumption of ICT devices.

Participants were given the opportunity to self-assess the carbon footprint generated by ICT equipments they own. This small game enabled us to present projects, initiatives and alternative existing in European cities to foster a market for green, energy-efficient and environmental-sound ICT and digital solutions. The game sparked some interesting discussions with stakeholders present in the Networking Village.

EUSEW17-1

 


On 7 and 8 June 2017, Malaga will host the 8th ‘Green Cities’ Forum of Urban Intelligence and Sustainability ‘, a smart city trade-fair attended by more than 27 000 professionals between 2010 and 2016.

In this 8th edition, two main spaces will be allocated for round-tables and presentations:

  • The “ICT & Sustainability Forum” space will stimulate an open debate on how the ICT industry contributes to optimal development of the information society in a sustainable world.

Round-tables and presentations will focus on Governance – Building – Digital Transformatin – Smart Cities – Energy – Finance – and Mobility.

  • The “Green Lab” area will provide space for presenting commercial and institutional products and services

 

Participants registered in Green Cities’ Networking will have access to an online meeting tool allowing them to debate, cooperate, do commercial deals and raise initiatives and projects with cities, participantsd and exhibitors.

Municipal technicians of the main Spanish cities on sustainable development, energy efficiency and smart management will be present.


Have a look at the speakers here!

How to participate? Go to this page.

 

The EU Sustainable Energy Awards are a major feature of the annual EUSEW policy conference. Twelve finalists are competing for the title of most successful project for secure, clean, and efficient energy in four categories (public sector; consumers; energy islands; and businesses). A high-level jury will decide the winner in each category. The awards ceremony is scheduled for 20 June.

Citizens are invited to vote online to pick the winner of the 2017 Citizens’ Award at http://www.eusew.eu/awards-public-vote

VOTE HERE

 

Gothenburg’s CELSIUS pilot project shortlisted in public sector category

The CELSIUS project (http://celsiuscity.eu/) aims to make it easier for local authorities and energy companies to develop energy-efficient district heating and cooling systems.

Gothenburg_architecture_pixabayDistrict heating and cooling systems are a sustainable, low-carbon way of keeping buildings comfortable and providing hot water. They provide centrally generated heat to buildings via a network of pipes.

Gothenburg is one of the project’s partner cities, along with Rotterdam, Cologne, Genoa, and London (Islington Council). The seven replication cities are Athens, Gdansk, Ghent, Gdynia, Riga, Viladecans, and Warsaw.

The project brings together 65 European cities along with other stakeholders from industry, academia, and special interest groups. Projects to test the technologies developed by CELSIUS have already cut CO2 emissions in Europe by almost €100,000 per year.

 


 

Gothenburg, green and sustainable city

 

More information on GDC/GuiDanCe training activities at http://bit.ly/GDC-training-activities.

 

On 30 and 31 May, Edinburgh hosted the first ‘work-shadowing visit’ organised under the Green Digital Charter/GuiDanCe umbrella. Delegates from the cities of Oulu and Reykjavik had the chance to discover Edinburgh’s sustainable policy and objectives, in which ICT play a central role.

Get insights from the visit in our storify timeline here!
Twitter-storify1

Extract from Storify (bit.ly/2r8EGi5)

Day 1 : In-site visits

After a first meet-up in the historical City Chambers, participants headed to the University of Edinburgh, a pioneer in terms of IT research.

To achieve its ‘smart transformation’, the City Council relies on strong relationships with research partners. Edinburgh Living Lab (ELL) also established within the University, plays the essential role of ‘experimentalist’ in the field of social innovation.

By organising a visit to ‘Transport for Edinburgh’ in the afternoon, the host meets its Oulu delegates’ own priority in terms of urban development: the implementation of a Sustainable Urban Mobility Plan (SUMP).

 

Day 2: Sustainable Edinburgh 2020 [watch the video]

Adaptation Scotland2On the second day, participants were invited in the Council’s main offices to discuss over Edinburgh’s sustainable development policy and objectives.

ICT play there an important role : from reporting energy consumption and improving energy efficiency in public buildings to supporting the ‘open space strategy‘ developed by the Council to enhance citizens’ interaction and ownership with their environment.

Particularly innovative is Edinburgh’s use of ICT in its sustainable urban food policy. From interactive maps to food apps, how can ICT drive change in citizens’ eating habits and attitudes toward food in the city?

 

 


Your city has signed the Green Digital Charter and is interested in visiting one of its peers?

Contact Rebecca Portail (project support officer) at rebecca.portail@eurocities.eu

 

City-scape

 

[This article was originally published on ICTFOOTPRINT.eu website]

Last week ICTFOOTPRINT.eu attended SMARTGREENS 2017, in Porto, Portugal, a conference that brought together researchers, designers, developers and practitioners interested in the advances and applications in Smart Cities, Green Information and Communication Technologies, Sustainability, Energy Aware Systems and Technologies.

This provided an excellent forum to showcase the project with an exhibition booth, where SMARTGREENS attendees got more detailed information about ICTFOOTPRINT.eu services, represented by Trust-IT Services (project coordinator) and EUROCITIES (project partner).

Smart cities as a key factor in ICT sustainability

Nantes-green-presentationA  20 minute presentation on “green insights” was also given explaining how ICTFOOTPRINT.eu services help cities reducing their ICT carbon footprint, by making informed decisions on how to make their ICT services sustainable and energy efficient.

The audience was made aware of why “green IT” is important for cities and why they have a key role in making the ICT sector more sustainable. ICT can save up to €600 billion & decrease 15% of carbon emissions in 2020, by becoming energy efficient (The Climate Group). Cities contribute to 70% of the world’s greenhouse gases (GHG), where +50% World Population lives.

Thanks to a policy of ‘low-carbon’ eco-labeled  IT equipment, Malmo city saved over 500.000 € in one year, while Linkoping decreased energy consumption by 30% (80.000 €).

In addition, some cities favouring green IT ecosystems, such as Nantes (France), where the city has organised demos of green IT projects, developed a Green Code Lab and a global eco-design certificate for an energy-efficient website, among other examples.

Getting familiar with tools & services for sustainability in ICT sector

Attendees were also made aware of ICTFOOTPRINT.eu tools which have been carefully developed to face the most common reasons why organisations do not become sustainable in ICT: lack of knowledge and expertise, lack of time, and low awareness of the benefits.

The Webinars give training and information to those who do not  have expertise and want to make their organisation more sustainable. The free marketplace is the online meeting point to find sustainable ICT suppliers with services and products that help stakeholders achieve lower levels of ICT carbon footprint.

The Self-Assessment Tool for ICT Services, known as SAT-S is a useful, free, quick and easy-to-use tool to calculate the carbon footprint of ICT services, which helps users make informed decisions on how to make their ICT services sustainable and energy efficient. The multilingual online help-desk (English, French, Spanish, Italian & German) gives customised support on sustainable ICT standards.

New audiences to promote energy efficiency in ICT

ICTFOOTPRINT.eu is happy to have showcased the project to new audiences and to find new synergies with different stakeholders, from researchers to Standard Development Organisations, which will support Europe in becoming more sustainable in its ICT.

Download the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu presentation here

Get the ICTFOOTPRINT.eu Flyer customised for Cities & Public Administrators here

Access the photo gallery on Flickr

env_energy_saving_ECaudiovisual Digital technologies are key enablers in reducing the carbon footprint of cities and improving energy efficiency. ICTs have a significant role to play vis-à-vis greening our urban spaces as they can provide energy savings to the building stock, improve the functioning of the electrical grid and water management systems etc.

Nonetheless, the ICT sector has a responsibility to reduce and minimise its carbon emissions. In pursuance of such ambitions, ‘smart cities’ are expected to incorporate the environmental impact of digital technologies which are deployed into their strategic thinking and planning*.

The Green Digital Charter and ICTFOOTPRINT.EU projects are seeking cities which are implementing projects, policies and activities aimed at measuring and/or reducing energy consumption of digital technologies.

The Swedish cities of Malmö and Linköping are prime examples of cities prioritising carbon-neutral technologies when approaching the marketplace.

All best practices shall be showcased during the SmartGreens conference in Porto (22 April) and the EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) in June.

Share yours with us at Rebecca.Portail[at]eurocities.eu


(*) see: ICTFOOTPRINT.EU 5th webinar on Solutions for energy management & Life Cycle Assessment)

Thursday 27 April 2017

12:00-13:00 (CEST)

WATCH THE WEBINAR

Read the report

Download the presentation


Becoming sustainable in ICT does not necessarily mean that we should only focus on the energy consumed by ICT.

We shall also take into account the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of all ICT components, which is about analysing the environmental impacts associated with all the stages of a product’s life : from raw material extraction through materials processing, manufacture, distribution, use, repair and maintenance, as well as disposal or recycling[*].

Agenda

Jean-Marc Alberola (Group Energy Strategy leader at Airbus & vice-chair of ETSI Industry-Specification-Group on Operational Energy Efficiency for Users, ISG-OEU) – Presentation of KPI DCEM (Key Performance Indicators on Data Centre Energy Management) and how to implement them in an industrial area of corporate ICT sites.

Fadri Casty & Tereza Lévová (EcoInvent) – Presentation of the world’s most consistent & transparent Life Cycle Inventory database, to help you make truly informed decisions about ICT products’ environmental impact.

Berina Delalic (multEE) – Introduction of the Monitoring & Verification Platform (MVP), a web-based tool calculating and storing data about energy and CO2 savings resulting from implement energy efficiency measures.

Silvana Muscella (ICTFOOTPRINT.EU project coordinator) monitored the webinar.

 


 

[*] Curious about e-waste? Watch ‘Ghana Digital Dumping Ground‘ (2009), a short documentary on Agbogbloshie, the world’s biggest wasteland for electronic devices.

 

This article was originally published on Covenant of Mayors website.

ELENA – European Local Energy Assistance:
Inspiration from successful projects
27 April 2017 11:00 – 12:00
Online, Belgium

This webinar will focus on the ELENA eligibility requirements and application process, and will also provide some examples of successful projects that have benefitted from an ELENA grant. One of these projects is BRITE – Bristol Retrofitting – Innovative Technologies for Everyone, which has enabled UK Covenant signatory Bristol to implement a number of sustainable energy projects.

Since 2009, ELENA has awarded around EUR 95 million to support an estimated EUR 4.5 billion of investment in local and regional authorities across Europe.

This webinar is particularly destined for municipalities and local authorities that are planning to deliver a project with an investment volume of at least EUR 30 million.

Organiser: Covenant of Mayors Office

Website: http://www.eumayors.eu

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