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In January, city representatives and experts gathered to discuss how to build smarter cities that work for all their residents at the ‘Imagine the Urban Future’ conference co-organised by the Green Digital Charter (GDC) and the EUROCITIES Knowledge Society Forum (KSF).

This was the first gathering of a series of ‘Imagine the Urban Future’ events, launched by EUROCITIES for 2018, an occasion to take an in-depth look at EUROCITIES’ vision, priorities and actions.

At the conference, participants brought their local experiences in working for a better urban future through the use of ICT and digital technologies, in particular related to environmental challenges and the future of work.

Speakers, workshops’ moderators and city representatives share their views in a series of individual interviews available on our YouTube channel : http://bit.ly/2tTGUUG.

 

This video gives a summary of the main topics treated at the ‘Imagine the Urban Future’ conference:

 

Two years after the first implementation monitoring document, a new report on the progress made by GDC signatories towards their commitments to the Charter has been published.

The Green Digital Charter (GDC) is a political declaration committing cities to use digital technologies to meet their carbon emission reduction targets, and contribute to the fight against climate change while improving governance.

Cover-monitoring-report-2017Based on evidence collected through a survey and interviews held with data officers and smart city project managers, this document builds on peer-learning activities and case-studies submitted from 38 different cities in order to provide an analysis of the situations in European cities involved in the activities of the project for the period 2016-2018.

The report is divided into four sections :

  1. Policy trends and development
  2. Cities co-create
  3. Cities innovate
  4. Cities measure

The findings confirm the trends tackled in the previous report, and highlight challenges encountered by cities: financing, progress measurement, administration’s internal working culture and staff skills, data management as well as the difficulty to deal with the great variety of standards on the market.

Overall, the cities are keen to improve sharing experiences and best practices, and opening up knowledge gained through concrete measures. This report intends to feed this collective effort for mutual learning and strengthen collaboration between European cities.

Flip the book online at http://anyflip.com/zerr/xjwy/ or directly below

 


The full report can also be downloaded at GDC Monitoring 2018 Web

Contacts:

Are the cities of the future to be a series of opal blue utopias, or streets of bent necked citizens crouching over screens?

At ‘Imagine the Urban Future’, the Green Digital Charter (GDC) and Knowledge Society Forum (KSF) joint conference held on 23 January, cities and experts gathered to discuss how they could build smarter cities that work for all their residents. How can leaders best mediate the dual tasks of moving their cities forward while ensuring that they are travelling in the right direction?

Putting the you in utopia

In her welcome speech, Eindhoven’s vice-mayor for innovation and KSF chair, Mary-Ann Schreurs stressed that tech innovation should never be for its own sake, but rather be centred around the citizen, “Let’s put the good life first, let’s put society first, let’s put technology in service of that.”

Anna-Lisa Boni, secretary general of EUROCITIES, suggested that we need open dialogue about the kinds of algorithms our technology will employ, so that citizens can have access to these otherwise opaque systems.

When used right, technology can be a major aid to democratic governance. Daniela Patti, managing director at Eutropian, pointed to the capacity of e-governance systems to increase the diversity of the people that governments connect to. As in Madrid’s Participa LAB, techniques like participatory budgeting and crowdsourcing regulation can put citizens in the driver seat of their cities. Indeed, as Peter Baeck, head of collaborative economy research at Nesta, pointed out, crowdfunding now accounts for 60% of the funding for start ups in the UK. If similar mechanisms can be set up at government level, high uptake can be expected.

 

Tech must work for people

Nevertheless, Mr Baeck also warned that cities risk not preparing their residents sufficiently for the technological tidal wave that may be swelling before us. How can cities help the potentially huge numbers of people whose jobs are soon to be automated? Local governments must provide training for people that enables them to switch professions.

Claire Courteille, director of the International Labour Organisation Brussels office, confirmed that the upskilling battle must be fought on two fronts. On one hand, people need to be retrained into careers that require soft skills, creativity, teamwork and collaboration. On the other hand, 40% of the EU workforce has little or no digital literacy – a stark figure. It is essential the training is provided for people so that they can engage in the digital world.

Ms Courteille declared that, “we must reject the idea of techno-predestination. We have to take control, upskill and prepare for rapid change. Life long learning will have to become a reality.”

Giving the example of the guifi.net mesh network, Mr Baeck concluded that people and groups have the potential to act in extremely innovative ways, but they must first be empowered to do so.

 

The future is in our cities

“Cities,” claimed Ms Schreurs, “are the foremost at creating solutions.” It is cities who are focussing on the interoperability of tech on a European level, and working together to create generic technology that delivers local solutions.

However, Ms Schreurs also warned that cities must take control, “You need a concept of what you want your city to be. If you don’t structure the cooperation and organise the governance, it won’t fly.” Markus Bylund, director of IT and digitalisation strategy for the city of Uppsala, emphasised that “If we continue as we are today, we will fail. In the key to the digital future, technology is just 10%, the rest is changing the way we do things.”

Taking on the titans

While cities like Amsterdam are bringing giant companies like Airbnb to the negotiating table and bargaining for better solutions, many cities still don’t feel empowered to shape globalisation to their own terms.

“This,” Ms Boni confirmed, “is the time for cities. It is important for cities to join forces by being part of a group that can really change things in policy making, through more funding and attention to cities, but one that also allows cities to work together to pool their insights and to innovate. The best way to predict the future is to create it”.

More imaginings

The series, ‘Imagine the Urban Future’, will continue throughout 2018, with events being organised in each EUROCITIES forum. Through this series of events, and high-impact campaigns such as Cities4Europe, EUROCITIES is taking its own advice by actively shaping the debate around the future that cities want to see within Europe and beyond.

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Sustainable, smart, resilient, green, free-flowing, econological, healthy. What will our future city look like?

Digital transition, climate action, everything-as-a-service, sustainable mobility, circular economy. How will our cities operate in the next decades?

Big Data, Internet of Things, blockchain, electromobility. Which technologies will be the game-changers in the foreeseable future?

New governance models, co-creation, citizen participation, public procurement for innovative solutions, innovation management. What are the challenges cities need to tackle?

  Register now at http://bit.ly/2k4yzZG

On Tuesday 23 January 2018 will be held EUROCITIES’ annual event on smart cities. Untitled “Imagine the Urban Future: Innovation, Collaboration, Trust”, this full-day conference will focus on trends, technologies and challenges that will shape future European cities. City representatives, high level policy makers and experts from across Europe will debate over expectations, opportunities and the impact of digital technologies in co-creating future cities and societies, with citizens.

The morning panel discussion will be followed by two rounds of parallel technical workshops, in which member cities are called to bring in their specific needs, challenges, concerns and concrete examples. The day will end with the GDC 2017 award ceremony to mark the closing of the GuiDanCe project in February.

MEET OUR FINALISTS

This full-day event is open to the public.

Agenda: GDCAgenda_flyerformat_20180108_final

 

data-protection-lockersThe conference will be preceeded by a technical training for cities’ data officers on the implementation of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). See: http://bit.ly/2Al7bha

Limited number of seats available (25 pers. max). Register now

The original article has been published on the Market Place of the European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities (here).

 

E3P is the name of the European Energy Efficiency Platform launched by the JRC, the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Its objective is to overcome the fragmentation of data and knowledge of Energy Efficiency and foster stakeholders’ cooperation.

The E3P is an interactive and collaborative online platform that it is still on beta. It is expected to be both a one-stop shop for information retrieval and a meeting point where experts can exchange data. The web platform is therefore a tool, provided by the JRC, which intends to facilitate knowledge exchange and ensures that the needs of the online community experts are met.

This European Energy Efficiency Platform is organised around six thematic areas of energy efficiency in products, cities, buildings, transport, industry and distribution (heating, cooling and electricity). In addition, a dedicated IT platform is at the centre with interactive and collaborative features.

Four collaborative tools are at the heart of the E3P: the Data Hub, the wikEE, the Community and the Calls. While the Data Hub is a one-stop-shop for the collection of data, the wikEE is for expert’s collaboration. Together, they have to support those people working on energy efficiency development, implementation and monitoring.

The community appears when the users decide to organise themselves into working groups to discuss about specific topics. Finally, the call can be published on the E3P if some specific data, content or experts are required.

For further information about the European Energy Efficiency Platform, click here.