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Green Digital Charter collection of case studies 2017

24 case-studies for 21 contributing cities: GDC signatories are leading the way in deploying digital solutions to reduce their carbon footprint and improve their citizens’ quality of life. Buildings, energy, transport, e-participation, green ICT, waste management :  this third publication gathers inspiring (and replicable?) solutions. Each case-study has its own person of contact. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with them!

Read our Flipbook at http://bit.ly/2ngXXu4

Or even browse the online book below!

 

This edition is already the third! Access the 2015 and 2016 catalogues on this page : http://bit.ly/GDC-case-studies.

 

env_energy_saving_ECaudiovisual Digital technologies are key enablers in reducing the carbon footprint of cities and improving energy efficiency. ICTs have a significant role to play vis-à-vis greening our urban spaces as they can provide energy savings to the building stock, improve the functioning of the electrical grid and water management systems etc.

Nonetheless, the ICT sector has a responsibility to reduce and minimise its carbon emissions. In pursuance of such ambitions, ‘smart cities’ are expected to incorporate the environmental impact of digital technologies which are deployed into their strategic thinking and planning*.

The Green Digital Charter and ICTFOOTPRINT.EU projects are seeking cities which are implementing projects, policies and activities aimed at measuring and/or reducing energy consumption of digital technologies.

The Swedish cities of Malmö and Linköping are prime examples of cities prioritising carbon-neutral technologies when approaching the marketplace.

All best practices shall be showcased during the SmartGreens conference in Porto (22 April) and the EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) in June.

Share yours with us at Rebecca.Portail[at]eurocities.eu


(*) see: ICTFOOTPRINT.EU 5th webinar on Solutions for energy management & Life Cycle Assessment)

3rd edition (Buying Green! Handbook), April 2016

On April 2016, the European Commission published a fully revised version of Buying Green! – A Handbook on green public procurement.

 

The Handbook is the European Commission’s main guidance document to help public authorities buy goods and services with a lower environmental impact. It is also a useful reference for policy makers and companies responding to green tenders.

The third edition of the Handbook includes:

  • Guidance on how environmental considerations can be included at each stage of the procurement process in the current EU legal framework (adopted in 2014)
  • Practical examples drawn from contracting authorities across EU Member States
  • Sector specific GPP approaches for buildings, food and catering services, road transport vehicles and energy-using products.

 

For more information, see the Commission’s website (http://bit.ly/1S8XZtM)

Smart Sustainable Cities – Reconnaissance Study (UNU-EGOV and IDRC)

As the global urban population is expected to grow exponentially by 2050, cities will face unprecedented sustainability challenges. A new report published by the United Nations University and funded by Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC), reviews smart city research and additional smart city case-studies. In particular, we welcome the inclusion of Barcelona, a signatory of the Green Digital Charter, with the ‘Sustainable Barcelona Map’ project.

The authors of the report highlight the importance of local circumstances in building smart cities as well as the need to involve a great variety of stakeholders. The report draws a series of policy recommendations, from open government initiatives to local sector-specific initiatives and citizen participation. Another one is about sharing best practices, a mission at the heart of the GuiDanCe project.

As such, cities’ “vision should not focus merely on technological development, but also highlight improvements in the economic, social, cultural, ecological, and governance dimensions. Leveraging social and cultural changes introduced by the Smart Sustainable City transformation is an opportunity to instil civic values in the society.”

 

 

Read the original article from the United Nations University, ‘Smart Sustainable Cities – Reconnaissance Study’ by clicking here.

Full report is available at http://bit.ly/25yCqwa (PDF English version).